NURSING YR BABY

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Simon & Schuster, Mar 2, 1977 - Family & Relationships - 289 pages
11 Reviews

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Review: Nursing Your Baby: Revised

User Review  - Leslie Lamb - Goodreads

I read the updated 2005 version for the 2nd time. If anyone is wondering about whether they should breast feed, it's a wonderful book and shows you all the benefits to your baby and yourself. I read it again since my second baby is coming soon! Read full review

Review: Nursing Your Baby: Revised

User Review  - Asho - Goodreads

My mother recommended this book to me as it was what she used as her advice manual to successfully breastfeed me and my two siblings in the 1980s. The book was originally written in the 1960s and the ... Read full review

Contents

Part
1
Babys RoleContagious EmotionsThe Bonds
14
How the Breasts Develop
27
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (1977)

Karen Pryor is a behavioral biologist with an international reputation in two fields, marine mammal biology and behavioral phsychology. She is a founder and leading proponent of "clicker training," a training system based on operant conditioning (isolate wanted behaviors and igrnore the unwanted) and the all-positive methods developed by marine mammal trainers. Clicker training is not in use world wide with dogs, cats, horses, birds, zoo animals, and increasingly with humans, in the teaching of sports and athletic performances and developing behaviors in autistics.

Pryor is the CEO of KCPT/Sunshine Books, Inc., a publishing, training product and Internet company. In addition to her bestselling Don't Shoot the Dog, Pryor wrote the catagory killer Nursing Your Baby (Simon & Schuster, more than 2 million copies in print) along with several other books and many scientific papers and pupular articles on learning and behavior. (see www.clickertaining.com)

Karen has three grown children and lives in Boston with two clicker-trained dogs and a clicker-trained cat.

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