The Russians on the Amur: its discovery, conquest, and colonization, with a description of the country, its inhabitants, productions, and commercial capabilities ... (Google eBook)

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Trübner and co., 1861 - History - 467 pages
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Page 25 - The natives appear to have been exposed to all sorts of extortion : tribute was levied to an unlimited extent, without any commensurate good being conferred upon the natives. No settlements of peasants or tillers of the soil were founded; the resources of the country were soon exhausted by perpetual foraging expeditions of Russian adventurers. When the Russians first arrived on the Amur, the natives cultivated fields and kept cattle.
Page 62 - In order to suppress the insolence of certain scoundrels, who cross the frontier to hunt, plunder, and kill, and who give rise to much trouble and disturbance; to determine clearly and distinctly the boundaries between the empires of China and Russia; and lastly, to re-establish peace and good understanding for the future, "The following articles are, by mutual consent, agreed upon:—*
Page 85 - Yes,' answered three or four of the best informed ; ' we believe in hell, like the bonzes of San-sim.' " ' Have you any means of escaping it.' . " ' We have never reflected on that point.' " ' "Well then,' I replied, ' I have an infallible secret, by means of which you can become more powerful than all the evil spirits, and go straight to heaven.
Page 81 - San-sim displayed to us its wooden walls and houses. This city presents nothing remarkable but its great street, inlaid with large pieces of wood, six inches thick and joined together with much precision. Its population is reckoned at ten thousand souls. The Manchu mandarin who governs it is of the second class (dark red button), and has under his jurisdiction the banks of the Usuri and the right side of the Amur as far as the sea. <; " The city of San-sim, the last post of the mandarins in the North,...
Page 467 - Printed by CLAY, on toned paper, and elegantly bound in embossed cloth, with appropriate design after KAULBACH ; richly tooled front and back. Price 16s. Best full morocco, same pattern, price 24s. ; or, neatly half-bound morocco, gilt top, uncut edges, Roxburgh style, price 18s.
Page 175 - Instead of mountains enclosing the valley of the river there stretches before the eye an extensive plain, with no visible limit on the left hand, and bounded on the right by low isolated ranges of hills.
Page 352 - In the beginning of September they prepare for winter pursuits. The leaves are falling, and it is the season when the roebuck and the doe are courting. The natives avail themselves of this, and, by cleverly imitating the call of the doe on a wooden horn, entice the buck near enough to shoot him. Generally speaking, this is the plentiful season of the year, 'so far as flesh is concerned; but, should the hunters not be fortunate, they live upon service-berries and bilberries, which they mix with reindeer...
Page 54 - The officers to whom I have entrusted the supervision of the sable-hunt, have frequently complained of the injury which the people of Siberia (Sokha) do to our hunters on the Amur, and particularly to the Ducheri. My subjects have never provoked yours, nor done them any injury; yet the people at Albazin, armed with cannons, guns, and other firearms, have frequently attacked my people, who had no firearms, and were peaceably hunting. Moreover, they...
Page 267 - Gilyaks on the mainland, and both in language and features they form a particular branch of that interesting people. The Tymy has a remarkably rapid current ; it never freezes, even when the cold descends below the freezing point of mercury. It abounds in fish, especially during spring ; several kinds of salmon are caught here, but particularly, as in the Amur, the Salmo lagocephalus. The Gilyaks of the Tymy collect immense stores of frozen fish, not only as food for themselves and their dogs during...
Page 55 - We therefore took possession of Albazin by force ; but even then we did not put any one to death. We liberated our prisoners ; but more than forty Russians, of their own free choice, preferred remaining amongst my people. The others we exhorted earnestly to return to their own side of the frontier, where they might hunt at pleasure. My officers however had scarcely left, when four hundred and sixty Russians returned, rebuilt Albazin, killed our hunters, and laid waste their fields, thus compelling...

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