Father Ernetti's Chronovisor: The Creation and Disappearance of the World's First Time Machine

Front Cover
New Paradigm Books, 2000 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 214 pages
1 Review
Blavatsky, Steiner, Spalding, Strieber -- all claim to have peered into the mists of the past or future and to have penetrated into mankind's origins and his destiny. In the middle decades of our century, an Italian Benedictine monk claimed to have made just such a journey. His name was Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti. He was a priest and scientist t and musicologist, one of the world's leading authorities on archaic music. He claimed to have yoked the insights of modern physics to the ancient occult knowledge of the astral planes to build, in secret, a time machine -- the chronovisor. He asserted that, using the chronovisor as his eyes and ears, he had watched Christ dying on the cross and attended a performance of a now-lost tragedy, Thyestes, by the father of Latin poetry, Quintus Ennius, in Rome in 169 B.C. Many have disputed Father Ernetti's claims, regarding which the Benedictine monk fell strangely silent in the last decade of his life. They say this distinguished scientist-priest was not telling the truth. But why would the brilliant Father Pellegrino Ernetti, So accomplished in other fields that his counsel was sought all over Europe, be driven to such a fabrication? This American edition of Father Ernetti's Chronovisor, translated from the German, contains the first translation ever out of Latin of the text of Thyestes which Father Ernetti claimed to have brought back with him using the chronovisor. It, and other newly-discovered documents, contain astonishing revelations. They make it impossible to dismiss the claims of the strange, tormented and brilliant Father Pellegrino Ernetti.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

The idea of a secret Vatican scientific team creating a working time machine (of sorts) is tantalizing. Unfortunately, there is a serious lack of proof here. As it turns out, the bulk of this book seems to be a veiled apologetic for the Theosophical Society rather than an account of Ernetti's involvement in the construction of a chronovisor. The author connects the two narratives via the ether, which for the Theosophist was the source of founder Blavatsky's knowledge, for the chronovisor, the carrier of the history of the universe. Read with a raised eyebrow. 

Contents

I
4
II
8
III
12
Copyright

26 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Bibliographic information