A New System of Domestic Cookery: Formed Upon Principles of Economy and Adapted to the Use of Private Families (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1824 - Cookery - 449 pages
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a rather fascinating view of cooking in the 1800's

Contents

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Page 293 - Set it on the shallow end of sieves in a lightly-warm oven, and turn it two or three times. It must not be cold till dry. Watch it carefully, and it will be beautiful. To prepare Barberries for Tartlets. Pick barberries that have no stones, from the stalks, and to every pound weigh three quarters of a pound of lump-sugar; put the fruit into a stone jar...
Page 98 - They will eat well out of the pickle without drying. \Yhen they are to be dried, let each piece, be drained over the pan; and when it will drop no longer, take a clean sponge and dry it thoroughly. Six or eight hours will smoke them, and there should be only a little sawdust and wet straw burnt to do this; b.ut if put into a baker's chimney, sew them in a coarse cloth, and hang them a week.
Page 288 - For a beautiful red, boil fifteen grains of cochineal in the finest powder, with a dram and a half of cream of tartar, in half a pint of water, very slowly, half an hour. Add in boiling a bit of alum the size of a pea. Or use beet-root sliced, and some liquor poured over. For white, use almonds finely powdered, with a little drop of water ; or use cream. For yellow, yolks of eggs, or a bit of saffron steeped in the liquor, and squeezed.
Page 332 - ... then, with four eggs beaten and strained, make into a paste; add caraways, roll out as thin as paper, cut with the top of a glass, wash with the white of an egg, and dust sugar over. Cracknels. Mix with a quart of flour half a nutmeg grated, the yolks of four eggs beaten, with four spoonfuls of rosewater, into a stiff paste, with cold water ; then...
Page 32 - Hams. Stick a sharp knife under the bone ; if it comes out with a pleasant smell, the ham is good ; but if the knife is daubed and has a bad scent, do not buy it. Hams short in the hock are best, and long-legged pigs are not to be chosen for any preparation of pork.
Page 400 - Do not cross nor go upwards. The dirt of the paper and the crumbs will fall together. Observe, you must not wipe above half a yard at a stroke and after doing all the upper part, go round again, beginning a little above where you left off. If you do not do it extremely lightly, you will make the dirt adhere to the paper. It will look Шее new if properly done.
Page 223 - ... lay a little of it at the bottom of the dish ; then put in the steaks prepared as above, and very well seasoned : pour the remainder of the batter over them, . and bake it. Mutton Pudding.
Page 344 - ... sugar ; when dissolved put the liquor in a barrel, and when fine, which will be in about two months, bottle it, and to each bottle put a spoonful of brandy, or a glass of vrine.
Page 63 - ... thin as paper with a very sharp knife, and in small bits. Throw the skin and any odd bits of the veal into a little water, with a dust of pepper and salt; set them on the fire while you beat the collops ; and dip them into a seasoning of herbs, bread, pepper, salt, and a scrape of nutmeg, but first wet them in egg. Then put a bit of butter into a frying-pan, and give the collops a very quick fry ; for as they are so thin, two minutes will do them on both sides ; put them into a hot dish before...
Page 321 - Sugar should be pounded in a mortar, or rubbed to a powder on a clean board, and sifted through a very fine hair or lawn sieve. Lemon-peel should be pared very thin, and with a little sugar, beaten in a marble mortar to a paste, and then mixed with a little wine or cream, so as to divide easily among the other ingredients. The pans should be of earthenware ; nor should eggs, or...

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