The Call to Write

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Pearson Longman, Aug 1, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 703 pages
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With a real-world genre orientation, attention to diverse media, focus on visual literacy, and emphasis on the ethics of writing, the third edition of "The Call to Write "continues to break new ground. Organized by genres--letters, memoirs, public documents, profiles, reports, commentaries, proposals, and reviews, this innovative rhetoric gives students the practice they need to write both in college and in the public sphere. Connecting writing to the real worlds of everyday life, college, and work, it gives students reasons to write and the skills to help them succeed. A strong emphasis on public writing promotes civic involvement through writing--to inform the public, to shape opinion, to advocate change, etc.--while relevant, provocative readings underscore when and why citizens are called to write. The Third Edition retains the best features of the second edition while greatly expanding the coverage of research. This hardcover version includes a grammar handbook. Individuals who want to master various forms of writing.

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Contents

What Is Writing? Analyzing Literacy Events
7
Analyzing
37
Strategies for Analyzing the Rhetorical Situation
47
Copyright

40 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

John Trimbur is a specialist in composition and writing studies, with interests in cultural studies of literacy and the politics of language in the United States and South Africa. He holds a B.A. from Stanford University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from State University of New York, Buffalo. Trimbur is the director of the First Year Writing Program at Emerson College in Boston. He has published widely on writing theory and has won a number of awards, including the Richard Braddock Award for Outstanding Article (2003) for "English Only and U.S. College Composition," the James L. Kinneavy Award (2001) for "Agency and the Death of the Author: A Partial Defense of Modernism," and the College Composition and Communication Outstanding Book Award (1993) for _The Politics of Writing Instruction: Postsecondary_. He also was a visiting professor at the Centre for Higher Education Development and a resident fellow at the Centre for Rhetorical Studies, both at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

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