The Journey Through Wales and the Description of Wales (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin UK, May 27, 2004 - History - 336 pages
4 Reviews
Scholar, churchman, diplomat and theologian, Gerald of Wales was one of the most fascinating figures of the Middle Ages and The Journey Through Wales describes his eventful tour of the country as a missionary in 1188. In a style reminiscent of a diary, Gerald records the day-to-day events of the mission, alongside lively accounts of local miracles, folklore and religious relics such as Saint Patrick's Horn, and eloquent descriptions of natural scenery that includes the rugged promontory of St David's and the vast snow-covered panoramas of Snowdonia. The landscape is evoked in further detail in The Description, which chronicles the everyday lives of the Welsh people with skill and affection. Witty and gently humorous throughout, these works provide a unique view into the medieval world.
  

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Review: The Journey Through Wales & The Description of Wales

User Review  - Huw Francis - Goodreads

An interesting and important commentary on Wales flawed by the religious pomposity of a man trying to 'improve' the uncivilised locals. Read full review

Review: The Journey Through Wales & The Description of Wales

User Review  - Dana - Goodreads

I relied heavily on this primary source material when writing my book (which is set in Wales). Part travelogue, part chronicle of the young men who go on the Crusades, and part adventure, Gerald of ... Read full review

Contents

THE JOURNEY THROUGH WALES
SECOND PREFACE26
HERE BEGIN THE CHAPTERHEADINGS
Book II
BOOK I
Chapter 2The journey through HayonWye and Brecknockshire
Chapter 3Ewias and Llanthony
Chapter 4The journey through Coed Grwyne and Abergavenny
BOOK I
Chapter 2Wales is divided into three parts
Chapter 3The genealogy of the Welsh Princes
Chapter 4The number of cantrefs royal palaces and cathedralsees in Wales
Chapter 5The noble rivers which divide Wales and mark itsboundaries and the mountainranges from which theytake their source
Chapter 6The fertility of Wales and its attractiveness
Chapter 7The origin of the names Cambria and Wales
Chapter 8The nature manners and customs of the WelshTheir boldness agility and courage

Chapter 5Our journey takes us past Usk Castle and through Caerleon
Chapter 6Our journey through Newport and Cardiff
Chapter 7The see of Llandaff and Margam Abbey
Chapter 8How we crossed the Rivers Avon and Neath and thenpassed through Swansea and Gower
Chapter 9How we crossed the River Loughor and the twoGwendraeth streams and what happened at Kidwelly
Chapter 10How we crossed the River Tywi in a boat Carmarthenand the monastery of Whitland
Chapter 11Haverfordwest and Rhos
Chapter 12Pembrokeshire
Chapter 13 Our journey through Camrose and Newgale
BOOK II
Chapter 2Our journey through Cemais and our stay inSt Dogmaels monastery
Chapter 3The River Teifi Cardiganshire and Newcastle Emlyn304
Chapter 4Our journey through Lampeter the Abbey of StrataFlorida Llanddewi Brefi and the church of SaintPadarn the Great
Chapter 5How we crossed the River Dovey in boats and so cameto the territory of the sons of Cynan336
Chapter 6How we crossed the Traeth Mawr and the TraethBychan Nefyn Caernarfon and Bangor
Chapter 7The island of Anglesey or Mona
Chapter 8How we crossed the River Conw ay in a boatDinas Emrys
Chapter 9The mountains of Snowdonia
Chapter 10How we travelled through Degannwy Rhuddlan and thecathedral town of Llanelwy or St Asaph The quicksandand Coleshill
Chapter 11How we crossed the River Dee Chester
Chapter 12How we journeyed through Whitchurch OswestryPowys and Shrewsbury
Chapter 13Our journey over Wenlock Edge through BromfieldLudlow Castle and Leominster and so back to Hereford
Chapter 14 A description of Baldwin Archbishop of Canterbury
THE DESCRIPTION OF WALES
THE SECOND PREFACE TO THE SAME462
HERE BEGIN THE CHAPTERHEADINGS OFGERALD THE WELSHMANS BOOKThe Description of Wales
The chapterheadings of Book II
Chapter 9Their frugality and parsimony
Chapter 10Their hospitality and eating habits
Chapter 11How the Welsh cut their hair take care of their teethand shave off their beards
Chapter 12Their natural acumen and shrewdness
Chapter 13Their choral music and partsinging
Chapter 14Their witticisms and plays on words
Chapter 15Their boldness and confidence in speaking up forthemselves
Chapter 16Welsh soothsayers who behave as if they are possessed
Chapter 17Their respect for noble birth and ancient genealogy
Chapter 18How they received the true religion long ago their pietyand their devotion to the Christian faith
BOOK II PREFACE
Chapter 2They live on plunder and have no regard for the tiesof peace and friendship
how shamefully and ignoblythey run away
Chapter 4Their desire to own land and the quarrels betweenbrothers which ensue
Chapter 5The greediness of the Welsh and the demands whichthey make on people
Chapter 6The crime of incest and the abuse by which churchlivings are both shared and handed down from fatherto son
Chapter 7The sins of the Welsh through which they lost first Troyand then Britain
Chapter 8How the Welsh can be conquered
Chapter 9How Wales should be governed once it has been conquered
Chapter 10How the Welsh can best fight hack and keep up theirresistance
APPENDIX 1
APPENDIX 2
APPENDIX 3
INDEX
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Gerald of Wales was born c.1145 in Pembrokeshire. He died in obscurity, possibly in Lincoln in 1223. He wrote seventeen books, all of them in Latin, and was well-connected to the Royal Family of his day.

Lewis Thorpe was Professor of French at Nottingham University from 1958 to 1977. He was President of the British Branch of the International Arthurian Society. He died in 1977.

Bibliographic information