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Books Books 1 - 10 of 43 on Dear Robin, our fleshly reasonings ensnare us. These make us say, 'heavy,' 'sad,'....  
" Dear Robin, our fleshly reasonings ensnare us. These make us say, 'heavy,' 'sad,' 'pleasant,' 'easy.' Was there not a little of this when Robert Hammond, through dissatisfaction too, desired retirement from the Army, and thought of quiet in the Isle of... "
The trials of Charles the first, and of some of the regicides - Page 164
1832
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The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 32

Ralph Griffiths, G. E. Griffiths - English imprints - 1764
...Hammond, through diflatisfa&ion too, defired retirement from the army, and thought of quiet in the Iflc of Wight. Did not God find him out there ? I believe...never forget this.' — And now I perceive, he is to feek again, partly through his fad and heavy burthen, and partly through diflatisfa&ion with friends...
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Annual Register, Volume 8

Edmund Burke - History - 1766
...Hammond, through diffatisfaition too, defired retirement from the army, and thought of quiet in the Ifle of Wight. Did not God find him out there.? I, believe...never forget this. — -And now I perceive, he is to feek again, partly through his fad; and heavy burthen, and partly through diflatisfaftion with friend'»...
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Dodsley's Annual Register

Edmund Burke - History - 1793
...Hammond, through diffatisfailion too, defired retirement from the' army, and thought of quiet in the Ifle of Wight? Did not God find him out there? I believe...never forget this. — And. now I perceive he is to feek again, partly through his fad and heavy burthen, and partly through diflatisfaftion with friends...
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Annual Register, Volume 8

History - 1802
...through diff» (¡stacl ion too, defired rrtirement firm the atmy, and thought of quiet in the lile of Wight? Did not God find him out there ? I believe...never forget this. — And now I perceive, he is to feck again, partly through his fad and heavy burthen, and partly through difl'.itiataftion with friends...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61

Literary Criticism - 1847
...fleshly reasonings ensnare us. These make us pay 'heavy,' ' sad,' 'pleasant,' ' easy.' Was there not a little of this when Robert Hammond, through dissatisfaction...army, and thought of quiet in the Isle of Wight ? Did nut God find him out there 1 I believe he will never forget this. And now I perceive he is to seek...
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A Narrative by John Ashburnham of His Attendance on King Charles ..., Volume 1

John Ashburnham, George Ashburnham Ashburnham (3d Earl of) - Great Britain - 1830
...our fleshly reasonings ensnare " us. These make us say heavy, sad, pleasant, " easy. Was there not a little of this when Robert " Hammond, through dissatisfaction...from the army ; and thought of quiet " in the Isle of flight ? Did not God find him " out there ? I believe he will never forget "this."* Thus are two great...
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The Trials of Charles the First: And of Some of the Regicides

Charles I (King of England) - Great Britain - 1832 - 338 pages
...befall us ; they bring forth M 2 the exercise of faith and patience ; whereby in the end (James 1st) we shall be made perfect. " Dear Robin, our fleshly...with friends' actings. Dear Robin, thou and I were never.worthy to be doorkeepers in this service. If thou wilt seek, seek to know the mind of God in...
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The trials of Charles the First: and of some of the regicides

Charles I (King of England), Great Britain. High Court of Justice for the Trying and Judging of Charles Stuart, King of England, Great Britain. Central Criminal Court - Great Britain - 1832 - 338 pages
...things befall us ; they bring forth the exercise of faith and patience ; whereby in the end (James 1st) we shall be made perfect. " Dear Robin, our fleshly...through his sad and heavy burthen, and partly through diseatisfaction with friends' actings. Dear Robin, thou and I were never worthy to be doorkeepers in...
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Eminent British statesmen, Volume 6

Statesmen - 1838
...a resistance in a particular case. " Was there not," he asks, " a little of this [the providential] when Robert Hammond, through dissatisfaction too,...the army, and thought of quiet in the Isle of Wight ? " He proceeds : — " You say, * God had appointed authorities among the nations, to which active...
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