Travels in Syria and Egypt, During the Years 1783, 1784, & 1785, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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R. Morison, 1801 - Egypt
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Page 274 - Tar, or retaliation ; and the right of exacting it devolves on the nearest of kin to the deceased. So nice are the Arabs on this point of honour, that if any one neglects to seek his retaliation he is disgraced for ever. He therefore watches every opportunity of revenge ; if his enemy...
Page 319 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. I...
Page 241 - ... of the eastern sky. Volney remarks, that clouds are sometimes seen to dissolve and disperse like smoke; while on other occasions they form in an instant, and from a small speck increase to a prodigious size. This is particularly observable at the summit of Lebanon ; and mariners have usually found that the appearance of a cloud on this peak is an infallible presage of a westerly wind, one of the
Page 273 - If, therefore, a tribe, or any of its fubjecls, enter upon a foreign territory, they are treated as enemies, and robbers, and a war breaks out. Now, as all the tribes have affinities with each other by alliances of blood, or treaties, leagues are formed, which render thefe wars more or lefs general.
Page 291 - ... slave to the gaoler, and she determined to give him his liberty. An opportunity soon offered to effect her design. One day, when the gaoler was gone to bed intoxicated, and in a profound sleep, she gently took the keys from under his pillow, and after opening the door to the old man, returned them to their place unperceived by her master. The next day, when .the gaoler went to visit his prisoner, he was extremely astonished at finding he had made his escape ; and the more so since he could perceive...
Page 273 - ... of the tribe, whoever encroaches on it is deemed a violator of property ; this is with them the law of nations. If, therefore, a tribe, or any of its fubjecls, enter upon a foreign territory, they are treated as enemies, and robbers, and a war breaks out.
Page 183 - In vain tlo they describe the Turk softly reposing under their shade, and happy in smoking his pipe without reflection. Ignorance and folly, no doubt, have their enjoyments, as well as wit and learning ; but, for my own part, I confess I could never bring myself to envy the repose of slaves, or to dignify insensibility with the name of happiness.
Page 282 - ... or under cover, if it be cold, and there, ranged in a circle round a little fire of dung, their pipes in their mouths and their legs crossed, they sit a while in silent meditation, till on a sudden one of them breaks forth with,
Page 275 - ... but the piercing eye of the Bedouin is not to be deceived. Each tent, inhabited by a family, is divided, by a curtain, into two apartments, one of which is appropriated to the women. The empty fpace within the large circle ferves to fold their cattle every evening.
Page 274 - ... slain must be avenged by that of his murderer. This vengeance is called Tar, or retaliation; and the right of exacting it devolves on the nearest of kin to the deceased.

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