Bordering the Future: The Impact of Mexico on the United States

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2006 - Business & Economics - 167 pages
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The differences between the United States and Mexico may be immense, but their links—economic, political, and social—are profound, and growing stronger. In this incisive narrative, John Adams argues that Mexico, with which the United States shares a 1,951 mile border, is no sideshow but a pivotal component of American economic health and regional security. The primary theme that runs throughout this book is that Mexico has historically had, and will continue to e Drawing from the most current economic and demographic data and business examples, Adams demonstrates the depth and breadth of U.S.-Mexican relations, and their implications for American business and policymaking. In the process, he dispels popular myths about Mexico as an economic backwater or political distraction. The result is an authoritative and colorful account of our complex relationship with our neighbor to the south, and its broader implications for global growth and political stability.

The border between the United States and Mexico runs for 1,951 miles. The differences between the two nations may be immense, but their links—economic, political, and social—are profound, and growing stronger. In this incisive narrative, John Adams argues that Mexico is no sideshow, but a pivotal component of American economic health and regional security. The primary theme that runs throughout the book is that Mexico—its domestic growth and industrial capacity, population pressures, energy needs, political dynamics, and strategic location—has historically had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the United States.

Drawing from the most current economic and demographic data and business examples, Adams demonstrates the depth and breadth of U.S.-Mexican relations and their implications for American business and policymaking. A unique aspect of the book is his analysis of the competition between Mexico and China for American resources for investment, trade, and economic development. Adams also dispels popular myths about Mexico as an economic backwater or political distraction. The result is an authoritative and colorful account of our complex relationship with our neighbor to the south—and its broader implications for global economic growth and political stability.

  

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Contents

AGRICULTURE TIERRA Y LIBERTAD
17
LA FRONTERA THE BORDER AND IMMIGRATION
41
BLACK GOLD ENERGY DYNAMICS OF MEXICO
61
MEXICO VERSUS CHINA
77
MAQCIILAS TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND TRADE CORRIDORS
99
FOCUS ON THE FUTURE
121
NOTES
127
BIBLIOGRAPHY
149
INDEX
165
Copyright

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Page 1 - OF all that extensive empire which once acknowledged the authority of Spain in the New World, no portion, for interest and importance, can be compared with Mexico; — and this equally, whether we consider the variety of its soil and climate; the inexhaustible stores of its mineral wealth ; its scenery, grand and picturesque beyond example ; the character of its ancient inhabitants, not only far surpassing in intelligence that of the other North American races...
Page 15 - Trade (GATT), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the European Community (EC).

About the author (2006)

John A. Adams Jr. is President and CEO of Enterprise Florida Inc., a public-private partnership responsible for leading Florida's statewide economic development efforts.

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