An introduction to information theory: symbols, signals & noise

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Dover Publications, Nov 1, 1980 - Computers - 305 pages
8 Reviews
Covers encoding and binary digits, entropy, language and meaning, efficient encoding and the noisy channel, and explores ways in which information theory relates to physics, cybernetics, psychology, and art. "Uncommonly good...the most satisfying discussion to be found." — Scientific American. 1980 edition.

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Review: An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise

User Review  - David - Goodreads

A gentle, but someone dated (1961) introduction to information theory. Read full review

Review: An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise

User Review  - Kathleen Fredd - Goodreads

I learned a bit and enjoyed the read. Another reviewer said it was a 'gentle thorough' introduction to the topic. I can't speak to the thorough, not my field, but it was gentle. Pierce has a sense of ... Read full review

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Contents

THE WORLD AND THEORIES
1
THE ORIGINS OF INFORMATION THEORY
19
A MATHEMATICAL MODEL
45
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

JOHN R. PIERCE, M.D. (Col. MC, U.S. Army, Ret.), wrote the series of articles on which this book is based for Stripe, a publication for Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) personnel and included on dcmilitary.com, a Web site for military personnel in the Washington, D.C., area. Pierce recently retired after thirty years of active duty, a significant portion of that spent at WRAMC. With Pierce, JIM WRITER coedited a supplement to the journal "Military Medicine" on the 1900 Yellow Fever Board.

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