What Holds Us Together: Social Cohesion in South Africa

Front Cover
David Chidester, Wilmot Godfrey James, Phillip Dexter
HSRC Press, 2003 - Political Science - 356 pages
2 Reviews
In this collection of essays, leading South African intellectuals in government, organized labor, business, and local communities examine social cohesion and globalization in contemporary South Africa. From fruit pickers to multinational corporations and international human-rights movements, these discussions illustrate how globalization affects every level of society and impacts how South Africans perceive themselves. How social capital works in South Africa locally and under globalization is discussed in each article.
  

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Contents

I
1
II
21
III
23
IV
42
V
67
VI
81
VII
83
VIII
92
XII
173
XIII
193
XIV
195
XV
224
XVI
242
XVII
275
XVIII
277
XX
295

IX
120
X
141
XI
143

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Page 291 - I believe that it was really due to Lorenzo that I am alive today; and not so much for his material aid, as for his having constantly reminded me by his presence, by his natural and plain manner of being good, that there still existed a just world outside our own, something and someone still pure and whole, not corrupt, not savage, extraneous to hatred and terror; something difficult to define, a remote possibility of good, but for which it was worth surviving.
Page 289 - It was that shame we knew so well, the shame that drowned us after the selections, and every time we had to watch, or submit to, some outrage: the shame the Germans did not know, that the just man experiences at another man's crime; the feeling of guilt that such a crime should exist...
Page 289 - ... our souls with joy and yet with a painful sense of pudency, so that we should have liked to wash our consciences and our memories clean from the foulness that lay upon them; and also with anguish, because we felt that this should never happen, that now nothing could ever happen good and pure enough to rub out our past, and that the scars of the outrage would remain within us for ever, and in the memories of those who saw it, and in the places where it occurred, and in the stories that we should...
Page 62 - Constitution as the supreme law of the Republic so as to Heal the divisions of the past and establish a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights...
Page 325 - Social capital [...] refers to features of social organization, such as trust, norms, and networks that can improve the efficiency of society by facilitating coordinated actions".
Page 312 - A world divided into compartments, a motionless, Manicheistic world, a world of statues: the statue of the general who carried out the conquest, the statue of the engineer who built the bridge; a world which is sure of itself, which crushes with its stones the backs flayed by whips: this is the colonial world.
Page 155 - Some regions of Italy have many choral societies and soccer teams and bird-watching clubs and Rotary clubs. Most citizens in those regions read eagerly about community affairs in the daily press. They are engaged by public issues, but not by personalistic or patron-client politics. Inhabitants trust one another to act fairly and to obey the law. Leaders in these regions are relatively honest. They believe in popular government, and they are predisposed to compromise with their political adversaries.
Page 62 - Heal the divisions of the past and establish a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights; Lay the foundations for a democratic and open society in which government is based on the will of the people and every citizen is equally protected by law...
Page 290 - Because that look was not one between two men; and if I had known how completely to explain the nature of that look, which came as if across the glass window of an aquarium between two beings who live in different worlds, I would also have explained the essence of the great insanity of the third Germany.
Page 289 - So for us even the hour of liberty rang out grave and muffled, and filled our souls with joy and yet with a painful sense of pudency, so that we should have liked to wash our consciences and our memories clean from the foulness that lay upon them; and also with anguish, because we felt that this should never happen, that now nothing could ever happen good and pure enough to rub out our past, and that the scars of the outrage would remain within us for...

About the author (2003)

David Chidester is Professor of Comparative Religion at the David Chidester is Professor of Comparative Religion at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, author of "ChristiaUniversity of Cape Town in South Africa, author of "Christianity: A Global History "(2000), "Savage Systems: Colonialismnity: A Global History "(2000), "Savage Systems: Colonialism and Comparative Religion in Southern Africa "(1996), and "S and Comparative Religion in Southern Africa "(1996), and "Salvation and Suicide: Jim Jones, the Peoples Temple, and Jonalvation and Suicide: Jim Jones, the Peoples Temple, and Jonestown "(revised edition, 2003), and coeditor of "American Sestown "(revised edition, 2003), and coeditor of "American Sacred Space "(1995). "Savage Systems "and "Salvation and Suiacred Space "(1995). "Savage Systems "and "Salvation and Suicide "are winners of the American Academy of Religion Award cide "are winners of the American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in Religious Studies. for Excellence in Religious Studies.

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