Computational Principles of Mobile Robotics

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 28, 2000 - Computers - 280 pages
0 Reviews
This is a superb textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the field of mobile robotics. With a special emphasis on computation and algorithms, Dudek and Jenkin address a range of strategies for enabling robots to master problems of navigation, pose estimation, and autonomous exploration. While they concentrate on wheeled and legged mobile robots, they also discuss a variety of other propulsion systems with kinematic models developed for many of the more common locomotive strategies. Chapters present algorithms for both visual and nonvisual sensor technologies, including sonar, vision, and laser scanners. In the section on reasoning, the authors thoroughly examine the subject of planning and the issues related to spatial representation. A comprehensive overview of the field, Computational Principles of Mobile Robotics complements its discussion of state-of-the art methods with 139 illustrations of key current and historical technologies.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Overview and motivation
1
11 From Mechanisms to Computation
4
122 Early Autonomous Robots
6
13 Operational Regimes
10
15 A Guide to this Book
11
Locomotion
13
Mobile Robot Hardware
15
211 Wheeled Mobile Robots
16
534 Spatial Uncertainty
143
535 Complex Environments
144
54 Planning for Multiple Robots
147
55 Further Reading
148
Operating Environment
149
61 Functional Decomposition
150
611 Hierarchical
152
612 Blackboard
153

212 Complex Wheels
27
213 Tracked Vehicles
28
215 Aquatic Vehicles
39
216 Flying Vehicles
41
22 Offboard Communication
43
222 Untethered
44
23 Processing
45
242 Legged Robots
46
Sensing
49
Nonvisual Sensors and Algorithms
51
Bumpers
55
33 Internal Sensors
56
332 Gyroscopes
57
333 Compasses and Inclinometers
58
35 Sonar
59
351 Transducer Model
62
352 Data Interpretation
64
36 Radar
65
37 Laser Rangefinders
67
38 SatelliteBased Positioning GPS
68
39 Data Fusion
70
391 State Space Models
71
392 Kalman Filtering
75
310 Extended Kalman Filter
77
311 Biological Sensing
79
3112 Magnetic Sensing
80
312 Further Reading
81
Visual Sensors and Algorithms
82
41 Visual Sensors
83
411 Calibration
84
42 Object Appearance and Shading
88
43 Signals and Sampling
89
44 Image Features and Their Combination
91
441 Color and Shading
92
443 Correlation
94
445 Feature Detectors
95
446 Edges
96
447 Image Filters
103
449 Summary
104
452 Multiple Cameras
105
453 ModelBased Vision
106
454 Floor Anomaly Detection
107
455 EgoMotion
108
46 Active Vision
109
462 Stereo Heads
110
47 Other Sensors
112
472 BIRIS
114
473 Structured and Unstructured Light
115
475 COPIS and Paracamera
116
48 Further Reading
117
Reasoning
119
Representing and Reasoning About Space
121
511 Spatial Decomposition
122
512 Geometric Representations
125
513 Topological Representations
129
52 Representing the Robot
130
522 Simplifications
131
53 Path Planning for Mobile Robots
132
531 Searching a Discrete State Space
134
532 Constructing a Discrete Search Space
135
533 Searching a Continuous State Space
138
62 Reactive Control
154
621 Subsumption
155
622 Motor Schema
156
63 HighLevel Control
158
631 STRIPS
160
633 GRAMMPS
161
65 Genetic Algorithms
164
67 User Interface
166
68 Mobile Robot Software Development as Experimentation
167
69 Multiple Robots
169
691 Control Architectures
171
610 Further Reading
172
Pose Maintenance
174
71 Dead Reckoning
176
721 Landmark Classes
177
722 Triangulation
178
73 Servo Control
183
74 Kalman Filtering
185
741 Adaptive Localization at Multiple Scales
186
Perceptual Structure
197
751 Eigenlandmarks
198
76 CorrelationBased Localization
202
77 Global Localization
204
771 A Performance Guarantee for Strategy MDL
207
772 Practical OneShot Global Localization
209
78 Further Reading
210
79 Problems
211
Maps and Related Tasks
212
81 Sensorial Maps
214
82 Geometric Maps
219
821 Spiral Search
221
83 Topological Maps
224
831 MarkerBased Exploration
225
84 Multiple Robots
228
841 Rendezvous
230
842 Map Fusion
231
844 Exploration with Multiple Robots
232
Practical Mobile Robot Tasks
233
92 Robotic Assembly and Manufacturing
235
931 Driving Assistants
236
932 Convoy Systems
237
934 Automated Highway Systems
239
94 Robots for Survey and Inspection
240
95 Mining Automation
241
96 Space Robotics
242
962 Soviet
243
97 Autonomous Aircraft
244
98 Military Reconnaissance
245
910 Underwater Inspection
246
911 Agriculture and Forestry
247
9114 Harvesting Robots
248
914 Cleaning Robots
249
The Future of Mobile Robotics
251
1012 Flying and Swimming
252
102 Sensors
253
1031 User Interface
254
105 Future Directions
255
Bibliography
257
Index
273
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 268 - Retraction' Method for Planning the Motion of a Disc. J. Algorithms, 6:104-1 11, 1985.
Page 260 - Six formal properties of two-dimensional anisotropic visual filters: structural principles and frequency/orientation selectivity,

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Gregory Dudek is Professor of Computer Science and Director of the School of Computer Science at McGill University. He holds a James McGill Chair and is a member of the Center for Intelligent Machines, and has been co-author of over 150 refereed publications on robotics and computer vision.

Michael Jenkin is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at York University. He has co-edited a series of eight books on human and machine vision.

Bibliographic information