Understanding the political world: a comparative introduction to political science

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Pearson Education, 2005 - Political Science - 519 pages
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Introducing the reader to politics, Danziger's rich, comparative perspective illuminates how politics works in countries across the world. Politics and Knowledge; Political Beliefs; Political Actions; Influences on Beliefs and Actions; States and Nations; Political Institutions; Political Economy; Politics and Knowledge; Change and Political Development; Political Violence; Politics Between States; The More Developed Countries; The Developing Countries; How to Do Political Analysis. Anyone interested in understanding how government and politics works across the world.

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Review: Understanding The Political World: A Comparative Introduction To Political Science

User Review  - Zbhall - Goodreads

This book is a decent introduction to comparative politics. It can be a bit of a boring topic and very dry at times, but I think the author and editor did about as well as could be hoped for to make ... Read full review

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Contents

PART TWO Political Behavior
3
CHAPTER 4
22
Political Actions
51
Copyright

15 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

James N. Danziger is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine, where he also has served as Chair of the Department of Political Science, campus-wide Dean of Undergraduate Education, Chair of the Academic Senate, and Associate Director of the Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations. He is recipient of many honors and awards, including a Marshall Scholarship (to Great Britain), a Foreign Area Fellowship, Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, Phi Beta Kappa, and an IBM Faculty Award. He received the first UC Irvine Distinguished Faculty Lectureship Award for Teaching in 1987 and the UC Irvine Distinguished Service Award in 1997. His Ph.D. is from Stanford University, and he has held visiting appointments at the universities of Aarhus (Denmark), Pittsburgh, and Virginia. His research has received awards from the American Political Science Association and the American Society for Public Administration. He has published extensively, particularly on information technology and politics, and he is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Electronic Government Research. He has also been an active participant in local politics.

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