South Korea: A Country Study (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Andrea Matles Savada, William Shaw
DIANE Publishing, Jul 1, 1997 - 408 pages
2 Reviews
Describes and analyzes South Korea1s political, economic, social and national security systems and institutions. Examines the inter- relationships of those systems and the ways they are shaped by cultural factors. Provides a basic understanding of the observed society, striving for a dynamic portrayal. Particular attention is devoted to the people who make up the society, their origins, dominant beliefs and values, their common interests and the issues on which they are divided, the nature and extent of their involvement with national institutions, and their attitudes toward each other and toward their social system and political order.
  

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Contents

Political and Social Institutions
19
Korea under Japanese Rule
20
World War II and Korea
24
South Korea under United States Occupation 194548
25
Economy and Society
29
Establishment of the Republic of Korea
30
The Korean War 195053
31
The Syngman Rhee Era 194860 The Political Environment
33
Society under Rhee
35
The Postwar Economy
36
South Korea under Park Chung Hee 196179
38
The Military in Politics
39
Economic Development
43
Society under Park
45
Foreign Relations
50
The Transition
52
The Democratic Republican Party
53
Students in 1980
54
The Kwangju Uprising
55
The Chun Regime
56
The 1980 Constitution
57
Chuns Cultural Revolution
58
Economic Performance
59
The Demise of the Chun Regime
61
Chapter 2 The Society and Its Environment
67
Physical Environment Land Area and Borders
70
Topography and Drainage
71
Climate
72
Population
75
Population Trends
77
Population Settlement Patterns
79
Urbanization
81
Koreans Living Overseas
86
Social Structure and Values
88
Traditional Social Structure
91
The Emergence of a Modern Society
94
Social Classes in Contemporary South Korea
96
Traditional Family Life
99
Family and Social Life in the Cities
102
Changing Role of Women
104
Cultural Identity
108
Korea and Japan
109
The Korean Language
111
Education
114
Primary and Secondary Schools
116
Higher Education
118
College Student Activism
121
Religion Religious Traditions
122
Religion in Contemporary South Korea
127
Public Health and Welfare
128
Health Conditions
129
Health Care and Social Welfare
130
Chapter 3 The Economy
135
The Japanese Role in Koreas Economic Development
139
The Government Role in Economic Development
140
Industrial Policies
143
Economic Plans
144
Revenues and Expenditures
145
The Government and Public and Private Corporations
146
The Origins and Development of Chaebol
147
The Role of Public Enterprise
149
Pohang Iron and Steel Company
150
Korea Electric Power Corporation
152
Financing Development
153
Industry
155
Steel
156
Electronics
157
Automobiles and Automotive Parts
158
Money and Banking
171
Small and MediumSized Businesses
174
The Labor Force
175
Wages and Living Conditions
176
Industrial Safety
178
Subways and Railroads
181
Civil Aviation
182
Foreign Economic Relations
183
Foreign Trade Policy
188
Korea in the Year 2000 The Setting
190
The Role of Science and Technology
191
The Economic Future
193
Chapter 4 Government and Politics
197
The Constitutional Framework
200
The Government The Legislature
205
The Executive
206
The State Council
208
The Presidential Secretariat
210
The Civil Service
211
Local Administration
214
Political Dynamics
215
Events in 1988
219
Returning to the Politics of National Security 1989
225
Parties and Leaders
228
Interest Groups
233
Political Extremism and Political Violence
239
Human Rights
243
The Media
246
Foreign Policy
250
Basic Goals and Accomplishments
251
Relations with the United States
255
Relations with the Soviet Union
256
Relations with Japan
259
Relations with China
260
Relations with North Korea
261
Relations with International Organizations and the Third World
263
Future Prospects
264
Chapter 5 National Security
267
Development of the Armed Forces
271
The Choson Dynasty and the Japanese Colonial Period
272
The South Korean Army after World War II
274
War on the Korean Peninsula
275
South Koreas Response to the North Korean Military Buildup
276
The Militarys Role in Society
279
Organization and Equipment of the Armed Forces
281
Air Force
285
Navy and Marine Corps
286
Reserve and Civil Defense Forces
287
Recruitment Training and Conditions of Service
288
Officers and Noncommissioned Officers
290
Enlisted Personnel
291
Defense Spending and Military Production
293
Military Production
295
Strategic Planning for War
297
United States Forces in Korea
298
South Korean and United States Cooperation
302
Internal Security
303
Seouls Response
305
Intelligence Agencies
311
The Defense Security Command
314
Korean National Police
317
Criminal justice
322
Criminal Procedure
325
Appendix
333
Bibliography
347
Glossary
377
Index
383
Copyright

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Page 380 - Development (IBRD), the International Development Association (IDA), and the International Finance Corporation (IFC). The IBRD, established in 1945, has the primary purpose of providing loans to developing countries for productive projects.
Page iii - ... historical antecedents and on the cultural, political, and socioeconomic characteristics that contribute to cohesion and cleavage within the society. Particular attention is given to the origins and traditions of the people who make up the society, their dominant beliefs and values, their community of interests and the issues on which they are divided, the nature and extent...
Page 380 - IDA, a legally separate loan fund but administered by the staff of the IBRD, was set up in 1960 to furnish credits to the poorest developing countries on much easier terms than those of conventional IBRD loans. The IFC, founded in 1956, supplements the activities of the IBRD through loans and assistance designed specifically to encourage the growth of productive private enterprises in the less developed countries.
Page 53 - Committee and by the Subcommittee on International Organizations of the Committee on International Relations of the United States House of Representatives received much press coverage and weakened United States support for South Korea.
Page 337 - When you know Multiply by To find Millimeters 0.04 inches Centimeters 0.39 inches Meters 3.3 feet Kilometers 0.62 miles Hectares (10,000 m2) 2.47 acres Square kilometers 0.39 square miles Cubic meters 35.3 cubic feet Liters 0.26 gallons Kilograms 2.2 pounds Metric tons 0.98 long tons 1.1 short tons 2,204 pounds Degrees Celsius 9 degrees Fahrenheit (Centigrade) divide by 5 and add 32 Table 2.
Page iii - The authors seek to provide a basic understanding of the observed society, striving for a dynamic rather than a static portrayal. Particular attention is devoted to the people who make up the society, their origins, dominant beliefs and values, their common interests and the issues on which they are divided, the nature and extent of their involvement with national institutions, and their attitudes toward each other and toward their social system and political order. The books represent the analysis...
Page xiii - Measurements are given in the metric system; a conversion table is provided to assist those readers who are unfamiliar with metric measurements (see table 1 , Appendix). A glossary is also included.
Page 91 - Hsieh to be minister of education and teach people human relations, that between father and son, there should be affection; between ruler and minister, there should be righteousness ; between husband and wife, there should be attention to their separate functions; between old and young, there should be a proper order; and between friends, there should be faithfulness.
Page v - These individuals include Ralph K. Benesch, who oversees the Country Studies/Area Handbook program for the Department of the Army. The authors also wish to thank members of the Federal Research Division staff who contributed directly to the preparation of the manuscript. These people include Sandra W.
Page xiii - Spanish affairs. Chapter bibliographies appear at the end of the book; brief comments on sources recommended for further reading appear at the end of each chapter.

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