Yankee travels through the island of Cuba; or, The men and government, the laws and customs of Cuba, as seen by American eyes (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton & Co., 1856 - Cuba - 412 pages
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Page 127 - The discretion of a judge is the law of tyrants : it is always unknown ; it is different in different men ; it is casual, and depends upon constitution, temper, and passion. In the best, it is oftentimes caprice ; in the worst it is every vice, folly, and passion, to which human nature is liable.'*- Lord Camden.
Page 70 - Poles, cutting down the gunners, took the battery, the whole army was in flight, abandoning arms, ammunitions, and baggage. " This surprising exploit, in the glory it conferred upon one party, and the disgrace it heaped upon the other, can hardly be paralleled in the annals of war. It is indeed, almost incredible, even to those who are acquainted with Spanish armies, that a position, in itself nearly impregnable, and defended by twelve thousand men, should, without any panic, but merely from a deliberate...
Page 70 - Poles fell in among the gunners, and took the battery, the whole Spanish army was in flight, abandoning arms, ammunition, baggage, and a number of prisoners. This surprising exploit, in the glory it conferred upon one party, and the disgrace it heaped upon the other, can hardly be paralleled in the annals of war. It is indeed almost incredible, even to those who are acquainted with Spanish armies, that a position, in itself nearly impregnable, and defended by 12,000 men should, without any panic,...
Page 69 - ... column, when it should come within range. At that moment Napoleon rode into the mouth of the pass, and attentively examined the scene before him ; the infantry were making no progress, and a thick fog mixed with smoke hung upon the ascent ; suddenly, as if by inspiration, he ordered the Polish cavalry of his guard to charge up the causeway, and seize the Spanish battery. In an instant the foremost ranks of the first squadron were levelled with the earth by the fire of the great battery, and the...
Page 43 - How happy the soldier, who lives on his pay, And spends half-a-crown out of sixpence a day ; He fears neither justices, warrants, or bums, But pays all his debts with the roll of his drums.
Page 69 - He rode into the mouth of the pass, and attentively examined the scene before him. The infantry were making no progress ; a thick fog mixed with smoke hung upon the ascent ; suddenly, as if by inspiration, he ordered the Polish lancers of his guard to charge up the causeway, and seize the Spanish battery. The first squadron was thrown into confusion, by a fire which levelled the foremost ranks. General...
Page 232 - Le premier qui fut roi, fut un soldat heureux : Qui sert bien son pays n'a pas besoin d'aieux.
Page 38 - ... to keep off the rain Sometimes several ranches are seen together according to the number of runaways ; and when they secure places of difficult access, they rapidly increase and form palenques, or villages, where they cultivate roots and bananas for their food, which together with the animals they catch with traps, or steal from neighboring plantations, afford them sufficient nourishment. There are permanent palenques in the mountains of El...

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