The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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Atlantic Monthly Company, 1860
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Page 247 - History of New York, from the beginning of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty.
Page 221 - Therefore I should infer from analogy that probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth have descended from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed.
Page 137 - OF all those arts in which the wise excel, Nature's chief masterpiece is writing well...
Page 620 - THE GLACIERS OF THE ALPS : being a Narrative of Excursions and Ascents. An Account of the Origin and Phenomena of Glaciers, and an Exposition of the Physical Principles to which they are related.
Page 493 - A GLACIER is AN IMPERFECT FLUID, OR A VISCOUS BODY. WHICH IS URGED DOWN SLOPES OF A CERTAIN INCLINATION BY THE MUTUAL PRESSURE OF ITS PARTS.
Page 221 - I can entertain no doubt, after the most deliberate study and dispassionate judgment of which I am capable, that the view which most naturalists until recently entertained, and which I formerly entertained, namely, that each species has been independently created, is erroneous. I am fully convinced that species are not immutable...
Page 221 - ... been stated that I attribute the modification of species exclusively to natural selection, I may be permitted to remark that in the first edition of this work, and subsequently, I placed in a most conspicuous position namely, at the close of the Introduction the following words : "I am convinced that natural selection has been the main but not the exclusive means of modification.
Page 278 - He being thus lorded, Not only with what my revenue yielded. But what my power might else exact, like one Who having unto truth, by telling of it, Made such a sinner of his memory, To credit his own lie...
Page 490 - Netherlands, at the end of the fifteenth century and the beginning of the sixteenth, we find the allegorical drama giving way to more definite and direct personations.
Page 179 - Tobacco, divine, rare, superexcellent Tobacco, which goes far beyond all their panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used, but, as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as Tinkers do Ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, land, health, hellish, devilish, and damned Tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.

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