Clarendon Historical Society, Edinburgh, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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1882
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Page 274 - Ye was in the right not to come with the 100 men ye sent up to-night, when I expected four times the number. It is a pretty thing, when all the Highlands of Scotland are now rising upon their king and country's account, as I have accounts from them since they were with me, and the gentlemen of our neighbouring Lowlands expecting us down to join them, that my men should be only refractory.
Page 37 - Gate street, did communicate with the rest of the parishioners, these persons, seamen, purposing to goe to sea foure days after, for to discover a passage by the North Pole to Japan and China.
Page 196 - Dinwiddie, then attacked the enemy in the rear very handsomely. This stopped the march toward the left of our infantry, and finally caused them to turn toward Dinwiddie and attack us in heavy force. The enemy then again attacked at Chamberlain's creek and forced Smith's position. At this time Capehart's and Pennington's brigades of Custer's division came up, and a very handsome fight occurred.
Page 289 - Be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the cities of our God : and the LORD do that which seemeth him good.
Page 199 - Adams's house, and if I do, you can capture the whole of them. Any force moving down the road I am holding, or on the White Oak road, will be in the enemy's rear, and in all probability get any force that may escape you by a flank movement. Do not fear my leaving here. If the enemy remains, I shall fight at daylight.
Page 98 - ... during the season. This circumstance, and the cold, which some of his men, who. had been in the East Indies, could not bear, caused quarrels among the crew, they being partly English, partly Dutch, upon which the captain, Henry Hudson, laid before them two propositions. The first of these was to go to the coast of America, to the latitude of 40.
Page 116 - Half Moon," under the command of Henry Hudson, captain and super-cargo, to seek a passage to China by the north-east. But he changed his course and stood over towards New France, and having passed the banks of Newfoundland, in latitude 43 23',* he made the land in latitude 44...
Page 98 - May, directed his course along the northern coasts towards Nova Zembla ; but he there found the sea as full of ice as he had found it in the preceding year, so that he lost the hope of effecting anything during the season.
Page 350 - Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c., To all our loving subjects, of what degree or quality soever, greeting. If the general distraction and confusion which is spread over the whole kingdom doth not awaken all men to a desire and longing that those wounds which have so many years together been kept bleeding may be bound up, all we can say will be to no purpose. However, after this long silence, we have thought...
Page 46 - II., in the 18th of his reign, granted them to make their two brotherhoods one, by the name of the fraternity of Corpus Christi. Of Skinners, divers...

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