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" Those who won our independence believed that the final end of the state was to make men free to develop their faculties; and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary. They valued liberty both as an end and as a... "
Cyber Rights: Defending Free Speech in the Digital Age - Page 17
by Godwin
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Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations

Suzy Platt - Quotations, English - 1989 - 520 pages
...one of many quotations inscribed on Cox Corridor II, a first floor House corridor, US Capitol. 1O49 Those who won our independence believed that the final...was to make men free to develop their faculties; and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary. They valued liberty...
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Judicial Power and American Character: Censoring Ourselves in an Anxious Age

Robert F. Nagel - History - 1994 - 188 pages
...flag-burning issues. Here is Justice Louis Brandeis's inspiring evocation of a confident, tolerant people: Those who won our independence believed that the final...was to make men free to develop their faculties; and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary. They valued liberty...
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Words that Bind: Judicial Review and the Grounds of Modern Constitutional Theory

Law - 1995 - 236 pages
...that speech's purpose is not just to serve those ends. "Those who won our independence," he writes, believed that the final end of the state was to make men free to develop their faculties, and that in Its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary. They valued liberty...
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The Supreme Court Justices: A Biographical Dictionary

Melvin I. Urofsky - Biography & Autobiography - 1994 - 570 pages
...advocated the use of illegal force, Brandeis aligned himself with the Founding Fathers who, he asserted, "believed that the final end of the State was to make men free to develop their faculties." This could be done only if "deliberate forces" prevailed over those that were "arbitrary"; if citizens...
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Equal Freedom: Selected Tanner Lectures on Human Values

Stephen L. Darwall - Political Science - 1995 - 400 pages
...basis of Brandeis's own view is best expressed, I think, in the well-known paragraph which begins: "Those who won our independence believed that the...was to make men free to develop their faculties; and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary." This paragraph ends:...
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The Normative Constitution: Essays for the Third Century

Richard Kent Sherlock, Richard Sherlock, Kent E. Robson, Charles Wayne Johnson - Law - 1995 - 154 pages
...version of history and ignore merely rhetorical flourishes, we shall find Brandeis quite provocative. Those who won our independence believed that the final...was to make men free to develop their faculties; and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary. They valued liberty...
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Political Liberalism

John Rawls - Justice. - 1993 - 401 pages
...basis of Brandeis's own view is best expressed, I think, in the well-known paragraph which begins: "Those who won our independence believed that the...was to make men free to develop their faculties; and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary." This paragraph ends:...
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Legal Reelism: Movies as Legal Texts

John Denvir - Performing Arts - 1996 - 314 pages
The first volume to contain work by both humanists and legal specialists, Legal Reelism is a landmark text for those concerned with depictions of justice in the media and the ...
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Intelligent Organization

Gifford Pinchot Elizabeth Pinchot - Business & Economics - 1996 - 399 pages
...exercise of power. Defending the Rights of Members As Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandéis said, Those who won our independence believed that the final end of the State was to make people free to develop their faculties. They valued liberty both as an end and as a means. They believed...
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Hate Speech and the Constitution, Volume 2

Steven J. Heyman - Law - 1996 - 1000 pages
...his concurring opinion in Whitney v. California. "Thuse who won our independence," he wrore, helieved that the final end of the State was to make men free to develop their facultiesl and that in its government the deliherative forces should prevail over the arhitrary. They...
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