Simla village tales: or, Folk tales from the Himalayas (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1906 - Folklore - 237 pages
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Page 5 - Hoo " instead of " Ha Jee " (Yes Life) respectfully, as he should have done. For this reason was everlasting life denied him, and where he stood, there were his ashes when he died. Even to this day, if a man should scratch himself, a line of white ash of which he was made is seen. If any man addresses another as "Jee
Page 152 - ... beautiful that it was the wonder of the country round. Hundreds of people were wont to gather together beneath it, and the poor carried away basket loads of its fruit. Thus it became a meeting place where a mela, or fair, was held when the fruit season was on. Now the fame of it reached a certain Rajah who had rented out the land, and one day he came with all his retinue to see it. "There is no such tree in the Royal Gardens,
Page 190 - But the men were curious, and, in spite of the warning, went to the witches' country. The witches saw them coming, and laughed gleefully. "Let us play a trick on these young Gurus," they said, " and turn them all into young bulls.
Page 152 - A mSla (festival) was regularly held beneath its shade, and the poor carried away basket-loads of its fruit, so that it came to be an annual meeting place. Now the fame of it reached a certain raja who had rented out the land, and one day he came with all his retinue to see it.
Page 160 - There are four rooms in this house which you must never open; I will point them out to you, but, for the rest, you may use them as you will." This request at once excited Bickermanji's old spirit of curiosity ; and, as soon as he found himself alone, he went quickly to the door of the first room and opened it. Within stood a horse, which turned gladly towards...
Page 153 - During my lifetime I defrauded the people. I gave them short measure and adulterated their food. " When I died and passed into the Land of Unhappy Spirits, the Gods, who are just, O King ! decreed that I should give back what I had stolen. My soul therefore went into a mulberry tree, where year after year the people gather fruit, and regain their losses. " In one year more they will be repaid to the uttermost cowrie?
Page 160 - In the first of these tales we meet with a situation which occurs again and again in folk-tales : the breaking of an order or request through unrestrained curiosity: "There are four rooms in this house which you must never open; I will point them out to you, for the rest, you may use them as you will.
Page x - All the tales were taken down in pencil, just as they were told, and as nearly as possible in the words of the narrators, who were village women belonging to the agricultural class of Hindus in the Simla district.
Page 153 - It is not meet that a subject should possess what the raja hath not," added the prime minister. The raja replied not a word, for his heart was filled with envy; and, that night before sleeping, he gave orders that on a certain day at early dawn, before anybody was astir, a party of armed men should take their axes to the village and cut down the mulberry tree. But ill dreams disturbed the raja's rest, and during the night a strange man appeared to him and said, ' O king live for ever ! I am the spirit...
Page 153 - I am the spirit of a bania (merchant) who died in yonder village many years ago. During my life time I defrauded the people. I gave them short measure and adulterated their food. When I died, therefore, and passed into the land of spirits, the gods who are just, O king, decreed that I should restore all I had stolen. My soul, therefore, entered a mulberry-tree, where, year after year, the people may gather fruit and regain their losses.

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