Ireland in the seventeenth century, or, The Irish massacres of 1641-2 [ed.] by M. Hickson (Google eBook)

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Mary Agnes Hickson
1884
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Page 176 - And that any countryman not in arms, nor under our protection, who has hy any sleight or promise of safety drawn, or caused to be drawn, in any person under our protection, to the taking away of his life, this with any case of the like kind shall be deemed murder. " As to religion, we do declare that it is not our intention, nor as we conceive the intention of those we serve, to force any to their worship and service contrary to their consciences. " HUGH ROGERS. ANDREW ELLIOTT. FREDERICK MULLENS....
Page 344 - Reily, my brother, and I, meeting the next May at Dublin, and the same messenger there too, it was resolved that he should return to the earl into Spain with their resolution ; which was that they would rise out twelve or fourteen days before or after Allhallontide as they. should see cause, and that he should not fail to be with them by that time. There was a report at that time, and before, that the earl of Tyrone was killed, which was not believed by reason of many such reports formerly which...
Page 213 - High Court of Justice at Dublin. MY LORD, Some public occasions drawing me at this time hither, I met with your Lordship's (order) to one Mr. Aykins (sic) for the apprehending of Colonel Miles MacSweeny with others as murderers of his father Mr. Aykins, a minister, and in regard some occurrences relating unto that matter are known to me, I thought myself obliged to give your Lordship an account of my knowledge. In September, 1652, I marched to suppress the said MacSweeny, who was in arms at that...
Page 242 - James Butler of Killslaugher, Theobald Butler of Ardmaile, Richard Butler of Ballynakill, Philip O'Dwyer, and divers others of good quality, and observed to the President how he had exasperated the people generally to run from house and home and that they were gathering in great numbers together, not knowing what to trust to. And that they the aforesaid gentlemen waited upon his lordship to be informed how affairs stood, and that they coveted nothing more than to serve his Majesty and preserve the...
Page 346 - And moreover they might be sure, nay, there was no doubt thereof, to procure money from the Pope, who gave several promises formerly to my Lord of Tyrone (in case he could make way to come into Ireland) to maintain six thousand men yearly at his own charge, and that notwithstanding my Lord of Tyrone was dead, yet that he the Pope would continue the same forwardness now.
Page 378 - Irish massacre, but he could see no reason to believe the king was accessory to it ; but he did believe that the queen did hearken to the propositions made by the Irish, who undertook to take the government of Ireland into their own hands, which they thought they could perform and then they promised to assist the king against the hot spirits in Westminster (Burnet's H-ist. of his own Times, vol. ip 41). I cannot distinguish between the king and queen considering their dark correspondence and joint...
Page 342 - I was in there, overwhelmed in debt, the smallness of my now estate, the greatness of the estate my ancestors had, and how I should be sure to get it again, or at least a good part thereof, and moreover how the welfare and maintaining of the Catholic religion, which he said the parliament of England will now undoubtedly suppress, doth depend on it.
Page 352 - Scots' troubles my Lord of Tyrone sent one Turlogh O'Neil, a priest, out of Spain, and that this, I take it, was the time that he was in treaty with Cardinal Richelieu to my Lord of Argyle, to treat with him for help from my Lord, for him to come into Ireland as was said for marriage between the said Earl and my Lord of Argyle's daughter or sister I know not which, and this messenger was in Ireland, with whom Mr.
Page 367 - Maguire's lodging, the said Hugh told him, that there were and would be this night great numbers of noblemen and gentlemen of the Irish papists, from all parts of the kingdom, in this town...
Page 368 - Hugh in his lodging the second time, the said Hugh swore, that he should not go out of his lodging that night, but told him that he should go with him the next morning to the castle ; and said, if this matter were discovered...

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