The sports and pastimes of the people of England ... (Google eBook)

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Printed for Thomas Tegg, 1838 - Games - 420 pages
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Page xlix - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 272 - This might be my lord such-a-one, that praised my lord such-a-one's horse, when he meant to beg it; might it not?
Page 152 - God; we acknowledge thee to be the Lord. All the earth doth worship thee, the Father everlasting. To thee, all Angels cry aloud; the Heavens, and all the Powers therein. To thee, Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry, Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth; Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty of thy Glory.
Page 397 - What, art mad ? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears: see how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: change places; and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?
Page liv - ... of temper ; as they do some other entertainments peculiar to our nation : I mean those elegant diversions of bull-baiting and prize-fighting, with the like ingenious recreations of the beargarden. I wish I knew how to answer this reproach which is cast upon us, and excuse the death of so many innocent cocks, bulls, dogs, and bears, as have been set together by the ears, or died untimely deaths, only to make us sport.
Page 353 - Let Ralph come out on May-day in the morning, and speak upon a conduit, with all his scarfs about him, and his feathers, and his rings, and his knacks.
Page 158 - ... the players conne not their parts without booke, but are prompted by one called the ordinary, who followeth at their back with the book in his hand, and telleth them softly what they must pronounce aloud.
Page 288 - Year. When I considered the Fragrancy of the Walks and Bowers, with the Choirs of Birds that sung upon the Trees, and the loose Tribe of People that walked under their Shades, I could not but look upon the Place as a kind of Mahometan Paradise.
Page 16 - tis a most pretty show ! Through Cheapside and Fenchurch Street, and so to Aldgate pump, Each man 's with 's spurs in 's horse's sides, and his back-sword cross his rump. My lord he takes a staff in hand to beat the bushes o'er ; I must confess it was a work he ne'er had done before. A creature bounceth from a bush, which made them all to laugh ; My lord he cried, A hare ! a hare ! but it proved an Essex calf.

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