An address delivered before the Society of alumni of the University of Virginia, July 1, 1869 (Google eBook)

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1869
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Page 16 - To be attached to the subdivision, to love the little platoon we belong to in society, is the first principle (the germ as it were) of public affections. It is the first link in the series by which we proceed towards a love to our country, and to mankind.
Page 33 - ... let it appear that he doth not change his country manners for those of foreign parts, but only prick in some flowers, of that he hath learned abroad, into the customs of his own country.
Page 32 - This good nature is so general among their people, that the gentry, when they go abroad, order their principal servant to entertain all visitors with everything the plantation affords. And the poor planters, who have but one bed, will very often sit up, or lie upon a form or couch all night, to make room for a weary traveller to repose himself after his journey.
Page 4 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Page 30 - A multitude, like which the populous North Pour'd never from her frozen loins, to pass Rhene or the Danaw, when her barbarous sons Came like a deluge on the south, and spread Beneath Gibraltar to the Lybian sands.
Page 32 - The Inhabitants are very courteous to Travellers, who need no other Recommendations, but the being human Creatures. A Stranger has no more to do, but to inquire upon the Road, where any Gentleman, or good HouseKeeper, lives, and there he may depend upon being received with Hospitality.
Page 23 - They spunge upon the Blessings of a warm Sun, and a fruitful Soil, and almost grutch the Pains of gathering in the Bounties of the Earth.
Page 32 - The inhabitants are very courteous to travellers, who need no other recommendation, but the being human creatures. A stranger has no more to do, but to inquire upon the road where any gentleman or good housekeeper lives, and there he may depend upon being received with hospitality. This good nature is so general among their people, that the gentry, when they go abroad, order their principal servant to entertain all visitors with everything the plantation...
Page 1 - Troianis cum multo gloria venit sanguine ; — sunt illis sua funera, parque per omnes tempestas— cur indecores in limine primo deficimus ? cur ante tubam tremor occupat artus ? multa dies variique labor mutabilis aevi rettulit in melius ; multos alterna revisens lusit et in solido rursus fortuna locavit.
Page 32 - ... everything the plantation affords. And the poor planters, who have but one bed, will very often sit up, or lie upon a form or couch all night, to make room for a weary traveler to repose himself after his journey. If there happen to be a churl, that either out of covetousness, or ill nature, won't comply with this generous custom, he has a mark of infamy set upon him, and is abhorred by all.

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