The life and times of viscount Palmerston, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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1866
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Page 10 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Page 78 - Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou hast great allies; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.
Page 178 - That thou wouldest be pleased to direct and prosper all their consultations to the advancement of thy glory, the good of thy Church, the safety, honour, and welfare of our Sovereign, and her Dominions ; that all things may be so ordered and settled by their endeavours, upon the best and surest foundations, that peace and happiness, truth and justice, religion and piety, may be established among us for all generations.
Page 182 - What person, unacquainted with the true state of the case, would imagine, in reading these astounding eulogies, that this "glory of the people" was the subject of millions of shrugs and reproaches! that this "protector of the arts...
Page 355 - Yes ! thy proud lords, unpitied land ! shall see That man hath yet a soul— and dare be free ! A little while, along thy saddening plains, The starless night of desolation reigns ; Truth shall restore the light by Nature given, And, like Prometheus, bring the fire of Heaven ! Prone to the dust Oppression shall be hurl'd, Her name, her nature, wither'd from the world...
Page 213 - Give me the avowed, the erect, the manly foe, Bold I can meet — perhaps may turn his blow ; But of all plagues, good heaven, thy wrath can send, Save, save, oh ! save me from the candid friend...
Page 110 - Along the lawn, where scattered hamlets rose, Unwieldy wealth and cumbrous pomp repose; And every want to luxury allied, And every pang that folly pays to pride. Those gentle hours that plenty bade to bloom, Those calm desires that asked but little room, Those healthful sports that graced the peaceful scene.
Page 246 - No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries; no climate that is not witness to their toils. Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Page 111 - Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates, and men decay : Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade ; A breath can make them, as a breath has made ;w But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, When once destroyed, can never be supplied.
Page 13 - Sunk pleased, though hungry, on her Sawney's breast. Far as the eye could reach no tree was seen, Earth clad in russet scorned the lively green : The plague of locusts they secure defy, For in three hours a grasshopper must die. No living thing, whate'er its food, feasts there But the chameleon, who can feast on air...

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