French Architects and Engineers in the Age of Enlightenment

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 7, 2010 - Technology & Engineering - 452 pages
0 Reviews
The professions of architect and engineer, which had maintained very close links since the time of the Renaissance, became increasingly isolated from one another in France during the course of the eighteenth century, the 'Age of the Enlightenment'. This book analyses the meaning of this gradual mutual isolation, the consequences of which can still be felt at a variety of different levels, and offers a unique insight in English to the teaching and practice of architects such as Jacques-Francois Blondel and Pierre Patte, and engineers such as Jean-Rodolphe Perronet and Gaspard-Riche de Prony. The text of the book is clear and easily comprehensible, and presents a fully accessible account of this key period in the development of architectural achievement and debate.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE CLASSICAL TRADITION
16
THE IMPACT OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT
35
THE ENGINEERS SYSTEM
99
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information