The Life and Services of Brevet Brigadier-General Andrew Jonathan Alexander, United States Army: A Sketch from Personal Recollections, Family Letters and the Records of the Great Rebellion (Google eBook)

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1887 - Generals - 135 pages
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Page 1 - the good of " which and " the use of " which are beyond all calculation of worldly goods and earthly uses : things such as Love, and Honour, and the Soul of Man, which cannot be bought with a price, and which do not die with death.
Page 1 - Very sweet are the uses of prosperity, the harvests of peace and progress, die fostering sunshine of health and happiness, and length of days in the land. But there be things oh, sons of what has deserved the name of Great Britain, forget it not! "the good of
Page 110 - At the age at which officers become colonels and majors, not one in fifty is able to stand the wear and tear of Indian service. They become still more worn in mind than in body. All elasticity is gone; all energy and enterprise worn out ; they become, after a fortnight's campaign, a burden to themselves, an annoyance to those under them, and a terror to every one but the enemy ! The officer who commanded the cavalry brigade which so disgraced the service at Chillian walla, was not able to mount a...
Page 11 - He distinguished himself as a midshipman in the War of 1812 and was present at the battle of Lake Erie.
Page 10 - ... celebrated chemical works at St. Rollox, Glasgow, was born at Ochiltree, Ayrshire. His father, John Tennant, was factor or steward to the Countess of Glencairn, and also rented a farm on her estate, in the culture of which he displayed great practical and scientific ability. John Tennant married twice ; after the death of his first wife, by whom he had two sons and one daughter, he married, in the year 1757, Margaret McLure, who, in the course of time, brought him a numerous family of six sons...
Page 110 - Chilianwala was not able to mount a horse without the assistance of two men. A brigadier of infantry, under whom I served during the three most critical days of the late war, could not see his regiment when I led his horse by the bridle until its nose touched the bayonets ; and even then he said faintly, ' Pray, which way are the men facing, Mr Hodson ? ' This is no exaggeration, I assure you.
Page 110 - William was quke right when he said that at the age at which officers become colonels and majors not one in fifty is able to stand the wear and tear of Indian service.
Page 96 - ... illustrates the fact that promptness to determine, bravery in the encounter, and vigor in the pursuit in War insure success ; whereas a more timid policy might invite disaffection, which would require large forces and extended operations to suppress. The sound discretion of Brevet Brig.-Gen. Carson, who, in the absence of detailed instructions, arranged a peace with the beaten Indians, when honor had been satisfied and they had been sufficiently punished, is highly commended.
Page 117 - IshouldTiave been hurried to the front and poured througrTtfae still open gap, when a determined rush of the whole fighting line and supports would have probably driven Hill and Early back upon the. reserves, Franklin, incapable of a bold offensive, / made no effort to assist his lieutenant, and, despite ' three urgent appeals for succour, left the gallant Pennsylvanians to their fate.
Page 96 - Alexander's operations against these Indians illustrates the fact that promptness to determine, bravery in the encounter, and vigor in the pursuit in War insure success ; whereas a more timid policy might invite disaffection, which would require large forces and extended operations to suppress. The sound discretion of Brevet Brig.-Gen.

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