Botany for High Schools (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1910 - Botany - 493 pages
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Page 398 - Department of Seed and Plant Introduction of the United States Department of Agriculture, which is already producing very important results for agriculture and horticulture in this country, especially in the Fig.
Page 83 - State is justified, for its own protection as well as for the protection of the children themselves, to put them into homes where they will be properly cared for.
Page 355 - Conifera* including some shrubs) or cone-bearing trees, the fruit being called a cone because of its form. This family of the class is the only one represented in our area. PINE FAMILY. PINACEAE. Pines. Conifers. Pinaceae. Coniferae. The trees belonging to this family are commonly known as Evergreens, because with the exception of the Larch and the Bald Cypress they do not shed their leaves during the winter.
Page 496 - OF 25 CENTS WILL BE ASSESSED FOR FAILURE TO RETURN THIS BOOK ON THE DATE DUE. THE PENALTY WILL INCREASE TO SO CENTS ON THE FOUR! DAY AND TO $1.OO ON THE SEVENTH DAY OVERDUE.
Page 169 - In the case of a number of varieties of strawberries, it is necessary to plant a "fertilizing" variety among them in order to insure fertilization, since some varieties are sterile to their own pollen. 296. Self-pollination and cross-pollination. Self-pollination occurs when the stigma is pollinated with pollen from anthers of the same flower. Cross-pollination occurs when the pollen is transferred from the anthers of one flower to the stigmas of another flower either near or remote. Cross-pollination...
Page 76 - LEAVES. 130. The arrangement of leaves on the stem seems to follow certain definite laws, and, barring accidents, is always the same for a given species. 131. Opposite leaves. Leaves are opposite on the stem when two arise at the same level, or node, but on opposite sides. The milkweed (Asclepias) is a good example, but there are many others, as the horse chestnut, lilac, etc. In these examples each pair is at right angles to the pair above and below, so that looking down the axis of the stem...
Page 454 - This theory has been accepted, because it appeals to the mind of man as being more reasonable that species should be created according to natural laws rather than by an arbitrary and special creation.

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