The Study of Chemical Composition: An Account of Its Method and Historical Development, with Illustrative Quotations (Google eBook)

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University Press, 1904 - Chemistry - 650 pages
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Page 262 - ... and to the discovery of middle axioms. And this way is now in fashion. The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general axioms last of all. This is the true way, but as yet untried.
Page 282 - While the particles continue entire, they may compose bodies of one and the same nature and texture in all ages ; but should they wear away or break in pieces, the nature of things depending on them would be changed.
Page 282 - ... even so very hard as never to wear or break in pieces; no ordinary power being able to divide what God himself made one in the first creation.
Page 281 - I do not here consider. What I call attraction may be performed by impulse, or by some other means unknown to me. I use that Word here to signify only in general any Force by which Bodies tend towards one another, whatsoever be the Cause.
Page 281 - Have not the small particles of bodies certain powers, virtues, or forces by which they act at a distance, not only upon the rays of light for reflecting, refracting, and inflecting them, but also upon one another for producing a great part of the phenomena of nature?
Page 261 - Now the true and lawful goal of the sciences is none other than this: that human life be endowed with new discoveries and powers.
Page 263 - But the induction which is to be available for the discovery and demonstration of sciences and arts must analyse nature by proper rejections and exclusions, and then, after a sufficient number of negatives, come to a conclusion on the affirmative instances...
Page 263 - But in establishing axioms by this kind of induction, we must also examine and try whether the axiom so established be framed to the measure of those particulars only from which it is derived, or whether it be larger and wider. And if it be larger and wider, we must observe whether by indicating to us new particulars it confirm that wideness and largeness as by a collateral security...
Page 294 - In all chemical investigations. it has justly been considered an important object to ascertain the relative weights of the simples which constitute a compound. But unfortunately the enquiry has terminated here; whereas from the relative weights in the mass, the relative weights of the ultimate particles or atoms of the bodies might have been inferred, from which their number and weight in various other compounds would appear, in order to assist and to guide future investigations, and to correct their...
Page 282 - Particles, would not be of the same Nature and Texture now, with Water and Earth composed of entire Particles in the Beginning. And therefore, that Nature may be lasting, the Changes of corporeal Things are to be placed only in the various Separations and new Associations and Motions of these permanent Particles; compound Bodies being apt to break, not in the midst of solid Particles, but where those Particles are laid together, and only touch in a few Points.

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