The Cold War: A New History

Front Cover
Penguin Press, 2005 - History - 333 pages
166 Reviews
In 1950, when Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong, Ho Chi Minh and Kim Il-Sung met in Moscow to discuss the future, they had reason to feel optimistic. International communism seemed everywhere on the offensive: Stalin was at the height of his power; all of Eastern Europe was securely in the Soviet c& America's monopoly on nuclear weapons was a thing of the past; and Mao's forces had assumed control over the world's most populous country. Everywhere on the globe, colonialism left the West morally compromised. The story of the previous five decades, which saw severe economic depression, two world wars, a nearly successful attempt to wipe out the Jews, and the invention of weapons capable of wiping out everyone, was one of worst fears confirmed, and there seemed as of 1950 little sign, at least to the West, that the next fifty years would be any less dark.

In fact, of course, the century's end brought the widespread triumph of political and economic freedom over its ideological enemies. How did this happen? How did fear become hope? In The Cold War, John Lewis Gaddis makes a major contribution to our understanding of this epochal story. Beginning with World War II and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, he provides a thrilling account of the strategic dynamics that drove the age, rich with illuminating portraits of its major personalities and much fresh insight into its most crucial events. The first significant distillation of cold war scholarship for a general readership, The Cold War contains much new and often startling information drawn from newly opened Soviet, East European, and Chinese archives. Now, as America once again finds itself in a global confrontation with an implacable ideological enemy, The Cold War tells a story whose lessons it is vitally necessary to understand.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
47
4 stars
61
3 stars
42
2 stars
12
1 star
4

Well researched, good information, and easy to read. - Goodreads
Not much new information, but an excellent overview. - Goodreads
Good intro/overview of the Cold War. Easy reading. - Goodreads
Great overall coverage of the topic. - Goodreads
Excellent book and easy to read. - Goodreads
Fantastic overview of the cold war. - Goodreads

Review: The Cold War: A New History

User Review  - B Kevin - Goodreads

Wow, has it really be almost 25 years since the end of the Cold War? Certainly time enough for the archives to be opened and some perspective reached. I found this to be a fascination book ... Read full review

Review: The Cold War: A New History

User Review  - Victor - Goodreads

Who said that Karl Marx is not actual... "History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce". Read full review

Contents

THE RETURN OF FEAR
5
European Territorial Changes 19391947
23
The Korean War 19501953
44
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

John Lewis Gaddis is the Robert A. Lovett Professor of History of Yale University. He is the author of numerous books, including The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941-1947 (1972); Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security (1982); The Long Peace: Inquiries into the History of the Cold War (1987); We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History (1997); The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past (2002); and Surprise, Security, and the American Experience (2004).

Bibliographic information