A Text book of physiology, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan & Company, 1891
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

71S The Ciliary Muscle
28
720 The Vitreous Humour and the Suspensory Ligament
29
SECTION IV
30
The Mechanism of Accommodation and the Movements of the Pupil 721 The Mechanism for Changing the Anterior Curvature of the Lens
31
The Evidence that such a Mechanism does effect the Result
32
Circumstances leading to Constriction and to Dilation of the Pupil
34
The Nerves supplying the Pupil
35
Constriction a Reflex Act by means of the Optic and Oculomotor Nerves
37
Changes in the Pupil through the Action of the Cervical Sympa thetic Nerve
40
SECTION V
41
Imperfections in the Dioptric Apparatus 732 Imperfections of Accommodation
47
Spherical Aberration
48
Chromatic Aberration
50
Entoptic Phenomena
51
The Optic Nerve
55
The Nervous Elements The Rods and Cones with the Rod Fibres
62
The Pigment Epithelium
68
The Relation of the Sensation to the Duration of the Stimulus
74
The Region of Distinct Vision The Limits of Distinct Vision
80
The Mixing of Colour Sensations
89
The Explanation of Colour Blindness on Herings Theory 765 The probable Subjective Condition of the Colour Blind 766 Blue or Violent Blindness...
99
106
106
On the Development of Visual Impulses 770 The Blind Spot
110
771 Purkinjes Figures their Import Ill j 772 Possible Theories as to the Mode of Origin of Visual Sensations
114
773 Photochemistry of the Retina Visual Purple
115
774 Hypothetical Visual Substances Insufficiency of our Present Knowledge
118
The Functions of the Layer of Rods and Cones The Ophthalmoscope
119
776 Possible Differences of Function of Rods and Cones
121
777 Electric Currents in the Retina
122
On some Features op Visual Sensations especially in Relation to Visual Perceptions 778 Simultaneous Visual Sensations the Visual Field
123
Irradiation
126
Afterimages Successive Contrast
127
The Phenomena of Contrast in their Bearing on the Theories of Colour Vision
128
Recurrent Sensations Ocular Phantoms or Hallucinations
132
Binocular Vision 785 The Movements of the EyeBall their Limitations Centre of Rotation Visual Axis Visual Plane
134
The Visual Field aud Field of Sight of one Eye and of both Eyes
135
Corresponding or Identical Points
137
The Movements of the EyeBall the Primary Position and Sec ondary Positions the Kind of Movements which are possible
139
Listings Law the Experimental Proof
141
The Muscles of the EyeBall
143
The Action of the Ocular Muscles
145
The Nervous Mechanism of the Movements of the EyeBalls the Coordination of the Movements
148
The Nervous Centres for the Movements of the EyeBalls
151
The Horopter
153
On some Features of Visual Perceptions and on Visual Judgments 795 On the Differences between the Objective Field of Sight and the Subjective Fi...
155
The Psychical Processes belonging to Visual Perceptions Illusions and Visual Judgments
158
Judgment of Distance and of Actual Size
160
The Judgment of Solidity
163
The Struggle of the Two Fields of Vision
164
The Nutrition of the Eye 801 The Arrangement of the Blood Vessels
165
The VasoMotor Changes in the Eye
166
The Eustachian Tube
196
The General Structure of the Cochlea
202
The Constituent Cells Cylinder or Hair Cells Rod or Spiudle Cells
208
The Organ of Corti
214
The Tectorial Membrane
221
The Characters of Noises
227
S50 The Analysis of Complex Waves of Sound Theories as to the Mode
234
On Auditory Perceptions and Judgments
241
Olfactory Sensations
250
Gustatory Sensations
259
868 The Nerves of Taste the Chorda Tympani
265
Tub Nerve Endings of the Skin
267
875 Touch Cells in the Epidermis aud elsewhere
273
The General Characters of Temperature Sensations
279
Hunger and Thirst
285
The Terminal Organs for Sensations of Heat different from those
291
S93 The Afferent Impulses forming the Basis of the Muscular Sense
297
The Ties between Touch and Sight
303
The Glottis Tlie Superior Aperture and the Several Features
309
901 The Arytenoid Cartilages
315
905 The Fundamental Features of the Voice Loudness Pitch
316
The Action of the Muscles in Reference to narrowing and widen
322
ChestVoice and HeadVoice The Registers of the Voice
328
917 The Manner of Formation of the Several Vowels
334
On some Locomotor Mechanisms
342
The General Features of Reproduction
349
The Structure of the Graafian Follicles
355
The Changes in the Uterine Mucous Membrane
361
The Chemical Constituents of Semen
369
Erectile Tissue
370
The Nature of Erection
371
The Emission of Semen
372
CHAPTER IL
374
The Decidua Serotina is transformed into the Placenta
376
The Structure of the Placenta
377
The Nature of the Vascular Events taking place in the Placenta
378
The Shedding of the Placenta
379
The Embryo breathes by and feeds upon the Maternal Blood of the Placenta
382
The Blood and BloodFlow in the Umbilical Arteries and Umbilical Vein
383
The Amniotic Fluid its Nature and Origin its Relations to the Nutrition of the Foetus
384
The Transmission of Food Material from the Mother to the Foetus
386
Glycogen in the Foetus
388
The Movements of the Fretns 3S8 961 The Digestive Functions of the Foetus
389
The Foetal Circulation towards the Close of Uterine Life
390
The Cause of the First Breath
392
964 The Changes in the Circulation taking place at Birth
393
The Period of Gestation
395
971 The Inhibition of Parturition
402
Dentition
408
Other Diurnal Changes in the Functions
416

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 465 - Pure gold throughout." GUARDIAN. " Unquestionably the clearest and most complete elementary treatise on this subject that we possess in any language.
Page 466 - Translated with the Special Authority of the Author from the Second Revised and Enlarged German Edition by HAROLD J. STILES, MB, FRCS Edin., Senior Demonstrator of Surgery, University of Edinburgh, etc.
Page 315 - I, the base of the tongue; e, the upper free part of the epiglottis, e', the tubercle or cushion of the epiglottis; ph, part of the anterior wall of the pharynx behind the larynx ; in the margin of the aryteno-epiglottidean fold...
Page 230 - ... instantly restored. Or the balance, on which silence depends, may be upset by connecting the ear with a tube, whose other end lies close to the mouth of one of the pipes. By means of beats two notes may be tuned to unison with great exactness. The object is to make the beats as slow as possible, since the number of beats in a second is equal to the difference of the frequencies of the notes. Under favourable circumstances beats so slow as one in 30 seconds may be recognised, and would indicate...
Page 463 - FRS , Professor of Physiology in the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.
Page 467 - PRACTITIONER (THE) : A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF THERAPEUTICS AND PUBLIC HEALTH. Edited by T. LAUDER BRUNTON. MD, FRCP, FRS, Assistant Physician to St.
Page 413 - London, 1891. evidence that the organ becomes more vascular during mental activity. . . ." That sleep concerns the whole body, and not the brain alone, is well put by Sir Michael Foster. He says : " Though the phenomena of sleep are largely confined to the central nervous system, and especially to the cerebral hemispheres, the whole body shares in the condition. The pulse and breathing are slower; the intestine, the bladder, and other internal muscular mechanisms are more or less at rest, and the...
Page 468 - Assistant Physician to the Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest, Brompton ; Lecturer on Materia Medica at the Charing Cross School of Medicine and Assistant Physician to the Hospital Sm.
Page 93 - ... a mixture of red and blue. White again is quite distinct from all the colours in the narrower sense of that word, and black, which we must accept as a sensation, as an affection of consciousness, even if we regard it as the absence of sensation from the field of vision, is again distinct from everything else. Hence the sensations, caused by different kinds of light or by the absence of light, which thus appear to us distinct, and which we may speak of as ' native' or ' fundamental ' sensations,...
Page 461 - DISSECTIONS ILLUSTRATED: A Graphic Handbook for Students of Human Anatomy. By C. GORDON BRODIE, FRCS, Senior Demonstrator of Anatomy, Middlesex Hospital Medical School ; Assistant Surgeon, North-West London Hospital.

Bibliographic information