Sense and Sensibility, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Roberts Brothers, 1892
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Page 164 - His temper might perhaps be a little soured by finding, like many others of his sex, that through some unaccountable bias in favour of beauty, he was the husband of a very silly woman but she knew that this kind of blunder was too common for any sensible man to be lastingly hurt by it.
Page 75 - Brandon is just the kind of man," said Willoughby one day, when they were talking of him together, "whom everybody speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to.
Page 13 - He did not know what he was talking of, I daresay ; ten to one but he was light-headed at the time. Had he been in his right senses, he could not have thought of such a thing as begging you to give away half your fortune from your own child.
Page 83 - This will probably be the case,' he replied; 'and yet there is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.
Page 151 - ... and at length, as there was no necessity for my having any profession at all, as I might be as dashing and expensive without a red coat on my back as with one, idleness was pronounced on the whole to be the most advantageous and...
Page 30 - ... abilities in every respect improve as much upon acquaintance as his manners and person. At first sight, his address is certainly not striking ; and his person can hardly be called handsome, till the expression of his eyes, which are uncommonly good, and the general sweetness of his countenance, is perceived. At present, I know him so well, that I think him really handsome ; or, at least, almost so. What say you, Marianne ? " " I shall very soon think him handsome, Elinor, if I do not now.
Page 130 - And how does dear, dear Norland look? " cried Marianne. "Dear, dear Norland, " said Elinor, "probably looks much as it always does at this time of the year, the woods and walks thickly covered with dead leaves." "Oh," cried Marianne, "with what transporting sensations have I formerly seen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them driven in showers about me by the wind! What feelings have they, the season, the air altogether inspired! Now there is no one to regard them. They are...
Page 143 - I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not Eke ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles, or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower and a troop of tidy, happy villagers please me better than the finest banditti in the world.
Page 10 - Elinor, this eldest daughter whose advice was so effectual, possessed a strength of understanding, and coolness of judgment, which qualified her, though only nineteen, to be the counsellor of her mother, and enabled her frequently to counteract, to the advantage of them all, that eagerness of mind in Mrs. Dashwood which must generally have led to imprudence.
Page 23 - He was too diffident to do justice to himself; but when his natural shyness was overcome, his behavior gave every indication of an open, affectionate heart. His understanding was good, and his education had given it solid improvement. But he was neither fitted by abilities nor disposition to answer the wishes of his mother and sister, who longed to see him distinguished as they hardly knew what.

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