Conflict resolution: cross-cultural perspectives

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Praeger, 1998 - Political Science - 244 pages
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This unique collection of comparable case studies addresses the need to assess modes of conflict resolution in a larger sociocultural context with attention to varying approaches and cultural perspectives. Editors Avruch, Black, and Scimecca, together with other anthropologists and sociologists, propose and test different propositions, while looking toward a general theory of conflict and conflict resolution. Their joint effort should be of real interest to sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, indeed to all those concerned with ethnic studies and ethnoconflict today. The contributors examine different theoretical concepts and approaches to conflict resolution in five different cultures, American, Arab, Asian, Latin American, and Pacific societies. The interdisciplinary study offers a broad range of vantage points for considering interpersonal, community, institutional, and national problems. The authors analyze concepts of personhood, the role of power and authority, ethical values, and methods for negotiating differences, and conflict resolution as an emerging discipline.

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Contents

Foreword by Leonard w doob
1
Harmony Models and the Construction of
41
Idiocosm Caricature and Mask
61
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

KEVIN AVRUCH is Professor of Anthropology and a member of the Faculty Advisory Board of the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, at George Mason University.PETER W. BLACK is Professor of Anthropology and a member of the Faculty Advisory Board of the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, at George Mason University.JOSEPH A. SCIMECCA is Professor of Sociology at George Mason University.

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