Building the New Berlin: The Politics of Urban Development in Germany's Capital City

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Lexington Books, 2001 - Political Science - 263 pages
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Appraising the redevelopment of Berlin since the late nineteenth century, Elizabeth A. Strom details how the contests between politicians, bureaucrats, architects, and developers have become especially prominent since reunification. Whether addressing the historical struggle to shape the city into the important world capital that it is today, charting the (re)creation of Berlin as a national government center, or exploring the city's massive economic restructuring, Building the New Berlin illustrates the intimate relationship between architecture and politics in an ongoing dialogue about whom the city should serve. Strom suggests that Berlin is a unique case study of city building in the twentieth century due to Berlin's turbulent battles over the central city, the seat of national and local governance. Nonetheless, these tensions provide fertile ground for the study of the central questions of urban political economy. Strom has fashioned an accessible, well-written and perceptive study that not only is a valuable addition to urban development literature, but also provides a foundational understanding of the debate and controversy in the planning of Berlin's city center in the 1990s.

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Contents

Tables
12
The Political Life of the City
19
Central City Planning and Development
39
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Elizabeth A. Strom is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University.

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