Complete Printmaker (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Dec 1, 2009 - Art - 352 pages
2 Reviews
This revised and expanded edition takes the reader step by step through the history and techniques of over forty-five print-making methods.

From the traditional etching, engraving, lithography, and relief print processes to today's computer prints, Mylar lithography, copier prints, water-based screen printing, helio-reliefs, and monotypes, The Complete Printmaker covers various aspects of fine printmaking. The book also includes a survey of issues and contemporary concerns in the printmakers world.
  

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I have this book at home, access online, and a copy in my printmakers guild print shop library! Lovely book, with good information & specifics, with examples.
I wish I had a newer similar book that covered newer non-toxic processes as well.

Review: The Complete Printmaker

User Review  - Wendy - Goodreads

Getting ready for printmaking at Penland! Read full review

Contents

PUTTING THE IMAGE ON THE BLOCK
16
COLOR REGISTER METHODS
30
MATERIALS AND TOOLS FOR WOOD
43
Intaglio Prints
65
BASIC MATERIALS AND TOOLS
78
LINE ETCHING
95
MATERIALS FOR PRINTING
109
MULTIPLEPLATE PRINTING
123
MATERIALS FOR PRINTING
217
COLOR LITHOGRAPHY
224
PHOTOLITHOGRAPHY ON POSITIVE PLATES
230
UNINKED EMBOSSINGS
237
SEWN PRINTS
243
Computers and the Print
269
PRINTING FROM COMPUTERS
276
MAKING A SHEET OF PAPER
284

PRINTING THE COLLAGRAPH
142
OVERVIEW OF STENCIL TECHNIQUES
156
WATERBASED SCREEN INKS
169
OILBASED SCREEN INKS
182
Lithographs
191
Basic Lithographic Method
199
USING TRANSFER PAPER
206
PRINTING THE BOOK
290
Business of Prints
305
School Printmaking
329
3M VINYL AND ACETATE PRINTS
335
SCREENPRINTING INKS
341
INDEX
349
Copyright

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Page 2 - Woodcut Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Gift of Junius S. Morgan, 1919 HENDRIK GOLTZIUS Hercules Killing Cacus.

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About the author (2009)

Ross went to MIT where he obtained a bachelor's and master's in chemical engineering. He worked as an engineer for a number of years before changing professions and becoming a high school science teacher in Princeton, N.J., where he taught physics and chemistry for twenty six years at Princeton Day School.

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