Opinions of Eminent Lawyers on Various Points of English Jurisprudence: Chiefly Concerning the Colonies, Fisheries, and Commerce of Great Britain ; Collected and Digested, from the Originals in the Board of Trade and Other Depositories (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Goodrich and Company, 1858 - Commercial law - 787 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

lands
105
Of the Kings right to the woods in the Province of Maine
133
Talbot on the Kings right to the woods in New England
139
and Solicitor Raymond and Yorke
141
General Northey
147
right of escheat to an estate in Jamaica
153
The same lawyers opinion that the Queen might legally take
159
Third Of the Kings grants
160
sey
161
discussing objections to the Kings grants
168
Talbot on grants that are void for uncertainty
175
Fourth Of an anomalous exclusion of the Kings right
181
might establish a Court of Equity in Massachusetts Bay
194
Kings power of mercy
200
HOW FAR THE KINGS SUBJECTS WHO
206
Yorke how far the statute of monopolies exteuds to the colonies
213
Wearg on the extension of the laws of England to the colonies
215
uance of the American act of queen Ann
232
Councillor
238
Talbot on the effect of notice on the validity of a governors com
244
on the same subject
258
Governors of Proprietary Governments for observing the Acts
261
Yorke how far the proclamation of martial law suspends the functi
268
Murray on the same point
276
Lloyd on the privileges of the Jamaica Assembly
292
sembly of South Carolina could grant money to the Bill of Rights
296
one of the ablest lawyers which America ever produced after
306
nent lawyer of Maryland
320
OF THE WANT OF SOVEREIGNTY IN THE GOV
332
of temporary acts of Assembly which in his judgment could only
338
legislative proceedings at New York against Bayard and Hutchina
340
be taken for the regular transmission in order to the consideration
346
Lloyd on the usual privileges of the Jamaica Assembly
352
Strange on acts of North Carolina that were not binding either
359
act of Assembly creating paper money
373
fitness of other acts of the same Assembly
442
questions put on them
449
Lloyd on four acts of the Jamaica Assembly which after hearing
456
Murray how far an act of Assembly ought to be repealed which
460
The opinion of the AttorneyGeneral Northey on the general
467
on the jurisdiction of the Bermuda courts
474
Chancellors over idiots
481
The opinion of the AttorneyGeneral Northey on the same sub
486
venting prosecutions by information as inconsistent with the Kings
493
VIIL OF THE ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION
499
Barbadocs Assembly as inconsistent with the Admiralty Jurisdic
507
in Bermuda
522
Thompson on the pardon of pirates in the colonies
529
ces of the peace in Newfoundland
536
could not give power to establish a criminal court at Newfoundland
542
the King may instruct his governor of Newfoundland to cause to
543
King may restrain his subjects from going abroad
554
designed to be exported and which were used in the English man
560
trading to the British islands
566
carrying barley from Rochelle to Lisbon in 1708
570
ment of duties upon importation
576
Montague on the changes effected by the union in trade
582
tressed English seamen at Cadiz
588
the trade with the Indians
592
Mr Wests opinion relating to Custom House officers being con
599
er to grant a patent for making black pepper white
609
ies are to be punished in England
616
trading with Algiers
623
on the same subject
628
The opinion of the AttorneyGeneral Pratt on the question
639
of alienage and trading with her Majestys enemies
645
whether the goods imported from the United States must pay alien
688
States born there before the independence are on coming to this
727
Surinamdiscourse of by Mr J De Witt
744

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 93 - The Council established at Plymouth in the County of Devon, for the Planting, ruling, ordering and Governing of New England in America" and to them and their Successors grants all the lands, &c., Viz.
Page 702 - Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, to be free, sovereign and independent States ; that he treats with them as such, and for himself, his heirs and successors, relinquishes all claims to the Government, proprietary and territorial rights of the same, and every part thereof.
Page 79 - Hudson's river, and all the land from the west side of Connecticut river, to the east side of Delaware bay...
Page 196 - THE General Court shall forever have full power and authority to erect and constitute judicatories and courts of record, or other courts...
Page 46 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the Laws of God, the true profession of the Gospel, and the Protestant Reformed Religion established by law ? And will you maintain and preserve inviolably the settlement of the Church of England, and the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government thereof, as by law established...
Page 79 - Higansetts abutting upon the main land between the two Rivers there called or known by the several names of Connecticut and Hudsons River together also with the said...
Page 662 - And it is agreed, that all persons who have any interest in confiscated lands, either by debts, marriage settlements, or otherwise, shall meet with no lawful impediment in the prosecution of their just rights.
Page 50 - ... forever, hereafter, there shall be a liberty of conscience allowed in the worship of God, to all persons inhabiting, or which shall inhabit or be resident within our said province, and that all such persons, except papists, shall have a free exercise of religion; so they be contented with the quiet and peaceable enjoyment of the same, not giving offence or scandal to the government.
Page 527 - I am directed by the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to send you the inclosed Copy of...
Page 200 - To the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. MAY IT PLEASE YOUR LORDSHIPS, In Obedience to your Lordships...

Bibliographic information