Bridgewater House Library (Google eBook)

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Priv. print., 1918 - 20 pages
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Page 13 - His Grace of Bridge is with us, not less positive nor less prejudiced than usual. It is a great Disadvantage to live with our Inferiors either in Situation or Understanding. Self-Sufficiency is the natural Consequence, with many attendant Evils ; but his want of Religion makes him an Object of Pity. I do not mean that he does not believe in God, but there he is with the Gout and a disorder in his Stomach, and Death and Immortality never occupy either his Thoughts or Words, and he Swears ! At least...
Page 10 - It was a strange caprice of fortune that made the future poet of the Puritan epic the last composer of a cavalier mask.
Page 8 - His apprehension was keen and ready, his judgment deep and sound, his reason clear and comprehensive, his method and elocution elegant and easy. As a lawyer, he was prudent in counsel, extensive in information, just and honest in principle ; so that, while he lived, he was excelled by none, and, when he died, he was lamented by all.
Page 9 - In that brilliant period of court life which was inaugurated by Elizabeth and put an end to by the Civil War, a Mask was a frequent and favourite amusement. It was an exhibition in which pageantry and music predominated, but in which dialogue was introduced as accompaniment or explanation.
Page 12 - Contemporaries found him a learned man, "adorned with a modest and grave aspect, a sweet and pleasant countenance, a comely presence," who "delighted much in his library.
Page 6 - Which thy clear-eyed experience well descries, Great Keeper of the state of Equity, Refuge of mercy, upon whom relies The succour of oppressed misery; Altar of safeguard, whereto affliction flies, From th' eager pursuit of severity; Haven of peace, that labour'st to withdraw Justice from out the tempests of the Law.
Page 18 - I may venture to say, with affectionate humility, that the only fault of his character was having too high an estimate of those who were interested in misguiding him, and too little relianee upon his own unswayed convictions.
Page 13 - November 1793 she wrote to Granville LevesonGower, who was serving in the Navy, The Duke of Bridgewater arrived here two days ago as great a treat as ever, and a good deal more indolent, for I do not believe that his Grace's face has undergone the operation of washing these last two Months.
Page 15 - ... attention, both in this and in foreign countries. Had a wider field been chosen, it would have been difficult to limit the work to any reasonable proportions ; and even now, not a few productions, particularly such as are of a graver cast and of larger dimensions, are not included. It was thought that the materials supplied by them would not accord with the lighter subjects of tracts in verse and prose, with which the Library is peculiarly well furnished.

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