The streets of London (Google eBook)

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Richard Bentley, 1849 - City dwellers - 444 pages
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Page 42 - Fleet Ditch with disemboguing streams Rolls the large tribute of dead dogs to Thames, The king of dykes ! than whom no sluice of mud With deeper sable blots the silver flood.
Page 105 - I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming, and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfulness of God, (it being Sunday evening,) which this day se'nnight I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland...
Page 202 - Giving no offence in any thing, that the ministry be not blamed; but in all things approving ourselves as the ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses, in stripes, in imprisonments...
Page 6 - There when they came whereas those bricky towers The which on Thames' broad aged back do ride. Where now the studious lawyers have their bowers, There whilom wont the Templar knights to bide, Till they decayed through pride...
Page 191 - I have seen a dreadful vision since I saw you: I have seen my dear wife pass twice by me through this room, with her hair hanging about her shoulders, and a dead child in her arms : this I have seen since I saw you.
Page 161 - ... approach to me, somewhat in the manner of an actor in the part of Horatio, when he addresses Hamlet on the appearance of his father's ghost, 'Look, my lord, it comes.
Page 178 - I had no sooner spoken these words, but a loud, though yet gentle noise came from the heavens, (for it was like nothing on earth,) which did so comfort and cheer me, that I took my petition as granted, and that I had the sign demanded, whereupon also I resolved to print my book.
Page 92 - Little Britain was a plentiful and perpetual emporium of learned authors ; and men went thither as to a market. This drew to the place a mighty trade ; the rather because the shops were spacious, and the learned gladly resorted to them, where they seldom failed to meet with agreeable conversation. And the booksellers themselves were knowing and conversible men, with whom, for the sake of bookish knowledge, the greatest wits were pleased to converse.
Page 178 - If it be for thy glory, I beseech thee give me some sign from heaven ; if not, I shall suppress it...
Page 208 - President, Council, and Fellows of the Royal Society of London, for improving Natural Knowledge.

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