A Practical Guide to Garden Plants: Containing Descriptions of the Hardiest and Most Beautiful Annuals and Biennials, Hardy Herbaceous and Bulbous Perennials, Hardy Water and Bog Plants, Flowering and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Conifers; Hardy Ferns; Hardy Bamboos and Other Ornamental Grasses. Also the Best Kinds of Fruits and Vegetables that May be Grown in the Open Air in the British Isles with Full and Practical Instruction as to Culture and Propagation (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, 1901 - Botany - 1192 pages
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Page 57 - And in short space the laden boughs arise, With happy fruit advancing to the skies : The mother plant admires the leaves unknown, Of alien trees, and apples not her own.
Page iii - Explore the nature of each several tree, And, known, improve with artful industry : And let no spot of idle earth be found, But cultivate the genius of the ground : For open Ismarus will Bacchus please ; Taburnus loves the shade of olive-trees.
Page iii - A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO GARDEN PLANTS. Containing Descriptions of the Hardiest and most Beautiful Annuals and Biennials, Hardy Herbaceous and Bulbous Perennials, Hardy Water and Bog Plants, Flowering and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Conifers, Hardy Ferns, Hardy Bamboos and other Ornamental Grasses ; and also the best kinds of Fruit and Vegetables that may be grown in the Open Air in the British Islands, with Full and Practical Instructions...
Page 56 - The access of air is further prevented by means of clay, which has been worked up with a little chopped hay, horse or cow dung, and water, and which is applied to the place of junction so as to form a ball, tapering both upwards and downwards. In France, a composition of 28 parts black pitch, 28 Burgundy pitch, 16 yellow wax, 14 tallow, and 14 sifted ashes, is generally used instead of clay.
Page 100 - ... when growing is fatal to their health. Even in severe frosts air must be given abundantly in the daytime and the frames must not be muffled up. Stagnant air, whether damp or dry, is their worst enemy ; but if the weather is warm enough to set them growing, they may easily die for want of moisture. I will not say more than this, for experience is the best guide, and...
Page 75 - Hence, as may be inferred, a complete analysis of guano is a work of very considerable labour ; but as its agricultural value depends mainly on the quantities of ammonia, soluble and insoluble phosphates, and alkaline salts, which it contains, such analyses as those we have given are sufficient for practical purposes, and they are easily made. As good Peruvian guano sells at about 13 per ton, there is a strong inducement to adulterate it.
Page iii - Flowering and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Conifers, Hardy Ferns, Hardy Bamboos and other Ornamental Grasses; and also the best kinds of Fruit and Vegetables that may be grown in the Open Air in the British Islands, with Full and Practical Instructions as to Culture and Propagation. By JOHN WEATHERS, FRHS, late Assistant Secretary to the Royal. Horticultural Society, formerly of the Royal Gardens, Kew, etc. With 163 Diagrams.
Page 11 - Midrib, the large vein extending along the middle of a leaf from its petiole nearly or quite to the other end.
Page 69 - ... washed down into the soil and enrich it with food for the benefit of the newly formed or forming roots. (iv.) A good mulching of rich manure to all kinds of fruit trees after they have set their fruits is highly beneficial in assisting them to swell rapidly and ripen more quickly. Once a plant...
Page 99 - ... as soon as they wither ; in some cases the seed-head is nearly as ornamental as the flower, but I have before said that discretion must be used, even in this, as seedlings of some things are troublesome from their number. When ripe seed is gathered I recommend its being sown at once. It is then more likely to come up quickly, and as all such plants as we grow on rockeries are better sown in pans, there is seldom difficulty in keeping small seedlings through the winter. The greatest enemy we have...

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