The Voyage of the Beagle, Volume 29 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
P.F. Collier, 1909 - Beagle Expedition - 547 pages
96 Reviews
This is Charles Darwin's chronicle of his five-year journey, beginning in 1831, around the world as a naturalist on the H.M.S. Beagle.
  

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5 stars
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3 stars
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Incredibly easy to read (surprising to me). - Goodreads
Very interesting but quiet hard to read in places. - Goodreads
The prose is clear and accessible even a century later. - Goodreads
Darwin's writing is dry and the Sahara! - Goodreads

Review: Voyage of the Beagle

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

I loved this book and Darwin's viewpoints on the different places he visited. I have read the Origin of Species previously and so had a bit on an idea about his research and why he did it. I have also ... Read full review

Review: Voyage of the Beagle

User Review  - David - Goodreads

Anything Darwin has written should be read. The greatest mind in history? Definately up there Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
29
III
49
IV
74
V
93
VI
118
VII
135
VIII
155
XIII
269
XIV
290
XV
309
XVI
332
XVII
357
XVIII
394
XIX
425
XX
455

IX
191
X
219
XII
247
XXI
477
XXII
509

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Page 363 - And they had breastplates, as it were breastplates of iron: and the sound of their wings was as the sound of chariots of many horses running to battle.
Page 18 - The day has passed delightfully. Delight itself, howeTer, is a weak term to express the feelings of a naturalist who, for the first time, has wandered by himself in a Brazilian forest. The elegance of the grasses, the novelty of the parasitical plants, the beauty of the flowers, the glossy green of the foliage, but above all the general luxuriance of the vegetation, filled me with admiration.
Page 544 - Pampas, which are serviceable to mankind, produced an equal impression? I can scarcely analyze these feelings : but it must be partly owing to the free scope given to the imagination. The plains of Patagonia are boundless, for they are scarcely...
Page 544 - Tierra del Fuego, where Death and Decay prevail. Both are temples filled with the varied productions of the God of Nature : no one can stand in these solitudes unmoved, and not feel that there is more in man than the mere breath of his body.
Page 340 - Shortly after the shock, a great wave was seen from the distance of three or four miles, approaching in the middle of the bay with a smooth outline; but along the shore it tore up cottages and trees, as it swept onwards with irresistible force.
Page 103 - ... and for some time afterwards accompanies the young. The cock when on the nest lies very close ; I have myself almost ridden over one. It is asserted that at such times they are occasionally fierce, and even dangerous, and that they have been known to attack a man on horseback, trying to kick and leap on him. My informer pointed out to me an old man whom he had seen much terrified by one chasing him. I observe in Burchell's
Page 32 - In England, any person fond of natural history enjoys in his walks a great advantage, by always having something to attract his attention ; but in these fertile climates, teeming with life, the attractions are so numerous that he is scarcely able to walk at all.
Page 544 - Why have not the still more level, the greener and more fertile Pampas, which are serviceable to mankind, produced an equal impression? I can scarcely analyse these feelings: but it must be partly owing to the free scope given to the imagination.
Page 420 - It is, however, certain, that tortoises can subsist even on those islands where there is no other water, than what falls during a few rainy days in the year. I believe it is well ascertained, that the bladder of the frog acts as a reservoir for the moisture necessary to its existence : such seems to be the case with the tortoise.
Page 286 - I set out on a riding excursion, for the purpose of geologizing the basal parts of the Andes, which alone at this time of the year are not shut up by the winter snow. Our first day's ride was northward along the seacoast. After dark we reached the Hacienda of Quintero, the estate which formerly belonged to Lord Cochrane. My object in coming here was to see the great beds of shells, which stand some yards above the level of the sea, and are burnt for lime. The proofs of the elevation of this whole...

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