The Critical review, or, Annals of literature, Volume 52 (Google eBook)

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Tobias George Smollett
W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1781 - English literature
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Messrs. Buffon, Telliamed, Diderot, Robinet, La Mettrie, d'Alembert, Voltaire, &c. + réf (puisque compte-rendu) Les Helviennes, Lettres provinciales philosophiques

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Page 84 - He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius; he looks round on Nature and on Life with the eye which Nature bestows only on a poet, the eye that distinguishes in...
Page 91 - ... perspicacity. To every work he brought a memory full fraught, together with a fancy fertile of original combinations, and at once exerted the powers of the scholar, the reasoner, and the wit.
Page 84 - His descriptions of extended scenes and general effects bring before us the whole magnificence of Nature, whether pleasing or dreadful. The gaiety of Spring, the splendour of Summer, the tranquillity of Autumn, and the horror of Winter take in their turns possession of the mind.
Page 213 - Sermons shall be preached upon either of the following subjects, — to confirm and establish the Christian Faith, and to confute all heretics and schismatics — upon the divine authority of the Holy Scriptures — upon the authority of the writings of the Primitive Fathers, as to the faith and practice of the Primitive Church — upon the Divinity of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ — upon the Divinity of the Holy Ghost — upon the Articles of the Christian Faith, as comprehended in the Apostles
Page 85 - The great defect of The Seasons is want of method; but for this I know not that there was any remedy. Of many appearances subsisting all at once, no rule can be given why one should be mentioned before another; yet the memory wants the help of order, and the curiosity is not excited by suspense or expectation.
Page 20 - And Tib, my wife, that as her life Loveth well good ale to seek, Full oft drinks she till ye may see The tears run down her cheek : Then doth she trowl to me the bowl Even as a maltworm should, And saith, ' Sweetheart, I took my part Of this jolly good ale and old.
Page 84 - As a writer he is entitled to one praise of the highest kind: his mode of thinking, and of expressing his thoughts, is original. His blank verse is no more the blank verse of Milton, or of any other poet, than the rhymes of Prior are the rhymes of Cowley.
Page 84 - ... always equable, and always easy, without glowing words or pointed sentences. Addison never deviates from his track to snatch a grace; he seeks no ambitious ornaments, and tries no hazardous innovations. His page is always luminous, but never blazes in unexpected splendour.
Page 83 - As a teacher of wisdom, he may be confidently followed. His religion has nothing in it enthusiastic or superstitious: he appears neither weakly credulous, nor wantonly sceptical; his morality is neither dangerously lax, nor impracticably rigid. All the enchantment of fancy, and all the cogency of argument, are employed to recommend to the reader his real interest, the care of pleasing the Author of his being.
Page 411 - Calcutta, it fometimes occafions an inftantaneous rife of five feet : and both here, and in every other part of its track, the boats, on its approach, immediately quit the more, and make for fafety to the middle of the river.

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