Adam Bede

Front Cover
Penguin, 1980 - Fiction - 607 pages
15 Reviews
Hailed for its sympathetic and accurate rendering of nineteenth-century English pastoral life,Adam Bedewas George Eliot's first full-length novel and a bestseller from the moment of publication. Eliot herself called it "a country storyfull of the breath of cows and scent of hay." Adam Bede is an earnest and virtuous carpenter who is betrayed by his love, Hetty Sorrel, a pretty yet foolish dairymaid who is seduced by a careless young villager. The bitter, tragic consequences of her actions shake the very foundations of their serene rural community. WhileAdam Bederepresents a timeless story of seduction and betrayal, it is also a deeper, impassioned meditation on the irrevocable consequences of human actions and on moral growth and redemption through suffering.
  

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Review: Adam Bede

User Review  - Lisa James - Goodreads

Eliot's a good writer, but I always have a tough time with the archaic writing. The storyline is interesting, it takes place in the early days of the Methodist movement, & surrounds a pair of brothers ... Read full review

Review: Adam Bede

User Review  - Pamela - Goodreads

I'm a lifelong George Eliot fan, so it's strange that I just never got to Adam Bede before now. I suppose I was afraid it would fall short of Eliot's masterpieces, Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda, or ... Read full review

Contents

ADAM BEDE
1
The Workshop
7
The Preaching
16
After the Preaching
35
Home and its Sorrows
41
The Rector
56
The Hall Farm
72
The Dairy
84
The Delivery of the Letter
320
In Hettys BedChamber
332
Mrs Poyser Has Her Say Out
341
More Links
350
The Betrothal
357
The Hidden Dread
362
BOOK FIFTH
369
The Journey in Hope
371

A Vocation
89
Hettys World
97
Dinah Visits Lisbeth
104
In the Cottage
115
In the Wood
123
Evening in the Wood
134
The Return Home
139
The Two BedChambers
148
Links
161
BOOK SECOND
175
In Which the Story Pauses a Little
177
Church
186
Adam on a Working Day
208
Adam Visits the Hall Farm
215
The NightSchool and the Schoolmaster
232
BOOK THIRD
247
Going to the Birthday Feast
249
DinnerTime
259
The HealthDrinking
264
The Games
272
The Dance
280
BOOK FOURTH
291
A Crisis
293
A Dilemma
304
The Next Morning
312
The Journey in Despair
380
The Quest
392
The Tidings
406
The Bitter Waters Spread
413
The Eve of the Trial
422
The Morning of the Trial
427
The Verdict
432
Arthurs Return
439
In the Prison
446
The Hours of Suspense
456
The Last Moment
462
Another Meeting in the Wood
464
BOOK SIXTH
473
At the Hall Farm
475
In the Cottage
484
Sunday Morning
495
Adam and Dinah
507
The Harvest Supper
515
The Meeting on the Hill
528
Marriage Bells
533
Epilogue
536
George Eliots History of Adam Bede
540
The Germ of Adam Bede Hettys Story
544
Notes
548
Copyright

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Page xvii - require a sympathy ready-made, a moral sentiment already in activity; but a picture of human life such as a great artist can give, surprises even the trivial and the selfish into that attention to what is apart from themselves, which may be called the raw material of moral sentiment ... Art is the nearest thing
Page xvii - life; it is a mode of amplifying experience and extending our contact with our fellow-men beyond the bounds of our personal lot. All the more sacred is the task of the artist when he undertakes to paint the life of the People. It is
Page xvi - our social novels profess to represent the people as they are, and the unreality of their representations is a grave evil. The greatest benefit we owe to the artist, whether painter, poet, or novelist, is the extension of our sympathies. Appeals founded on generalizations and

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About the author (1980)

George Eliot was born Mary Ann Evans on a Warwickshire farm in England, where she spent almost all of her early life. She received a modest local education and was particularly influenced by one of her teachers, an extremely religious woman whom the novelist would later use as a model for various characters. Eliot read extensively, and was particularly drawn to the romantic poets and German literature. In 1849, after the death of her father, she went to London and became assistant editor of the Westminster Review, a radical magazine. She soon began publishing sketches of country life in London magazines. At about his time Eliot began her lifelong relationship with George Henry Lewes. A married man, Lewes could not marry Eliot, but they lived together until Lewes's death. Eliot's sketches were well received, and soon after she followed with her first novel, Adam Bede (1859). She took the pen name "George Eliot" because she believed the public would take a male author more seriously. Like all of Eliot's best work, The Mill on the Floss (1860), is based in large part on her own life and her relationship with her brother. In it she begins to explore male-female relations and the way people's personalities determine their relationships with others. She returns to this theme in Silas Mariner (1861), in which she examines the changes brought about in life and personality of a miser through the love of a little girl. In 1863, Eliot published Romola. Set against the political intrigue of Florence, Italy, of the 1490's, the book chronicles the spiritual journey of a passionate young woman. Eliot's greatest achievement is almost certainly Middlemarch (1871). Here she paints her most detailed picture of English country life, and explores most deeply the frustrations of an intelligent woman with no outlet for her aspirations. This novel is now regarded as one of the major works of the Victorian era and one of the greatest works of fiction in English. Eliot's last work was Daniel Deronda. In that work, Daniel, the adopted son of an aristocratic Englishman, gradually becomes interested in Jewish culture and then discovers his own Jewish heritage. He eventually goes to live in Palestine. Because of the way in which she explored character and extended the range of subject matter to include simple country life, Eliot is now considered to be a major figure in the development of the novel. She is buried in Highgate Cemetery, North London, England, next to her common-law husband, George Henry Lewes.

Stephen Gill was born in Bristol, England in 1971, a committed photographer since a teenager. He developed his unique approach - combining conceptualism with striking empathy for his human subjects - while working for Magnum Photos, and accepted his first assignment, for the New York Times Magazine, in 1997. Widely regarded as a key young European artist, Gill has had one person shows at the Photographers Gallery, London, Museum of Architecture, Moscow, and the Arles Festival of Photography, France. His work is widely published in magazines including Blind Spot, Doubletake, New York Times Magazine, Sunday Times, Granta, Tank, Dazed and Confused, The Guardian Magazine and Colors.

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