Griffiths' Guide to the Iron Trade of Great Britain (Google eBook)

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Griffith, 1873 - Iron industry and trade - 315 pages
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Page 290 - Yard, when compared with a Pendulum vibrating Seconds of Mean Time in the Latitude of London in a Vacuum at the Level of the Sea is in the proportion of Thirty-Six Inches to Thirty-Nine Inches and one thousand three hundred and ninety-three ten-thousandth Parts of an Inch...
Page 290 - Majesty to inquire into the subject of weights and measures, that a cubic inch of distilled water weighed in air by brass weights at the temperature of 62 degrees of Fahrenheit's thermometer, the barometer being at 30 inches, is equal to 252 grains, and 456 thousandth parts of a grain...
Page 312 - Ibs. by the cube of the length in feet; divide the product by 32 times the tabular value of E, multiplied into the given deflection in inches ; and the quotient is the breadth multiplied by the cube of the depth in inches.
Page 311 - When the beam is uniformly loaded throughout its length, the result must be doubled, ie it will support double the weight.
Page 309 - If a beam be supported at both ends and loaded in the miMle, its length being I — 2 c, its proof deflection is the same with that of a beam of the same transverse dimensions and of the length c, fixed at one end and loaded at the other ; and its proof load is double of that of the latter beam ; therefore its resilience is double of that of the latter...
Page 309 - If a beam 2 inches deep and one inch broad, support a given weight, another beam of the same depth, and double the breadth, will support double the weight: hence, beams of the same depth are to each other as their breadths: — again, If a beam two inches deep, and...
Page 290 - Gallon., containing Ten Pounds Avoirdupois Weight of distilled Water weighed in Air, at the Temperature of Sixty two Degrees of Fahrenheit's Thermometer, the Barometer being at Thirty Inches...
Page 312 - Divide the weight to be supported, in Ibs., by the tabular value of E, multiplied by the breadth and deflection, both in inches; and the cube root of the quotient, multiplied by the length in feet, equal the depth required in inches.
Page 309 - ... of the same depth are to each other as their breadths :—again, if a beam two inches deep and one inch broad, support a given weight, another beam of four inches deep and one inch broad, will support four times the weight ;—hence...
Page 290 - Fahrenheit's thermometer, the barometer being at 30 inches, is equal to 252 grains, and 456 thousandth parts of a grain, of which, as aforesaid, the Imperial Standard Troy Pound contains 5760 : Be it therefore enacted, that if at any time hereafter the said Imperial...

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