Foucault live: (interviews, 1961-1984)

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Semiotext(e), Jan 1, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 478 pages
3 Reviews
Currently in its fourth printing, Foucault Live is the most accessible and exhaustive introduction to Foucault's thought to date. Composed of every extant interview made by Foucault from the mid-60s until his death in 1984, Foucault Live sheds new light on the philosopher's ideas about friendship, the intent behind his classical studies, while clarifying many of the professional and popular misinterpretations of his ideas over the course of his career. As Gilles Deleuze noted, "the interviews in this book go much further than anything Foucault ever wrote, and they are indispensable in understanding his life work." Most notably, Foucault Live includes interviews he made with the gay underground press during his stays in America during the 1970s. In them, Foucault suggests that homosexuality presents a new paradigm for ways of living beyond the predictable, binary couple. All of the philosopher's interests, from madness and delinquency to film and sexuality, and their resultant writings, are probed by knowledgeable critics and journalists. After reading this book, the reader can explore key notions such as episteme, savoir and connaissance, archeology, and archive, without the knitted brow that plagued Foucault's public when he was alive. This is the guide to Foucault's life as an agent provocateur in the world of philosophy and scholarship.

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Review: Foucault Live: Interviews, 1961-84 (Semiotext(e) Foreign Agents Series)

User Review  - Kathleen - Goodreads

Foucault's interviews are useful because in them he provides explanations of his more controversial theses and responds to critics. Also interesting because within the interviews he often discusses ... Read full review

Review: Foucault Live: Interviews, 1961-84 (Semiotext(e) Foreign Agents Series)

User Review  - Nelson - Goodreads

Exploring connections among the following interviews: "Friendship as a Way of Life," "The Ethics of the Concern for Self," "The Aesthetics of Existence," and "Sex, Power, and the Politics of Identity ... Read full review

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Contents

Madness Only Exists in Society 7
7
A Literature of Knowledge
10
The Order of Things
13
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Michel Foucault was born on October 15, 1926, in Poitiers, France, and was educated at the Sorbonne, in Paris. He taught at colleges all across Europe, including the Universities of Lill, Uppsala, Hamburg, and Warsaw, before returning to France. There he taught at the University of Paris and the College of France, where he served as the chairman of History of Systems of Thought until his death. Regarded as one of the great French thinkers of the twentieth century, Foucault's interest was in the human sciences, areas such as psychiatry, language, literature, and intellectual history. He made significant contributions not just to the fields themselves, but to the way these areas are studied, and is particularly known for his work on the development of twentieth-century attitudes toward knowledge, sexuality, illness, and madness. Foucault's initial study of these subjects used an archaeological method, which involved sifting through seemingly unrelated scholarly minutia of a certain time period in order to reconstruct, analyze, and classify the age according to the types of knowledge that were possible during that time. This approach was used in Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason, for which Foucault received a medal from France's Center of Scientific Research in 1961, The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and The Archaeology of Knowledge. Foucault also wrote Discipline and Punishment: The Birth of the Prison, a study of the ways that society's views of crime and punishment have developed, and The History of Sexuality, which was intended to be a six-volume series. Before he could begin the final two volumes, however, Foucault died of a neurological disorder in 1984.

Sylvere Lotringer, general editor of Semiotext(e), lives in New York and Baja, California. He is the author of "Overexposed: Perverting Perversions" (Semiotext(e), 2007).

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