Freedom and Nature: The Voluntary and the Involuntary

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Northwestern University Press, 1966 - Philosophy - 498 pages
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Contents

Abstraction of the Fault
20
Abstraction of Transcendence
29
PURE DESCRIPTION OF DECIDING
37
Se Decider
55
Motivation of Willing
66
MOTIVATION AND THE CORPOREAL
85
Motives and Values on the Organic Level
104
Body and the Total Field of Motivation
122
Habit
280
MOVING AND EFFORT
308
Effort and Motor Intention
318
Being Able and Willing
327
THE PROBLEMS OF CONSENT
341
EXPERIENCED NECESSITY
355
The Unconscious
373
Structure
409

HISTORY OF DECISION FROM
135
The Process of Attention
149
Choice
163
Determination and Indetermination
181
PURE DESCRIPTION OF ACTING
201
Moving and Dualism
216
BODILY SPONTANEITY
231
Emotion
250
Growth and Genesis
425
Birth
433
THE WAY OF CONSENT
444
From Refusal to Consent
466
AN ONLY HUMAN FREEDOM
482
Index
495
Copyright

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References to this book

The Absent Body
Drew Leder
Limited preview - 1990
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About the author (1966)

Professor of philosophy at the University of Paris and the University of Chicago, Paul Ricoeur has been described as "possibly the only younger philosopher in Europe whose reputation is of the magnitude of that of the old men of Existentialism---Marcel, Jaspers, Heidegger and Sartre . . . ." His work has been characterized as "the most massive accomplishment of any philosopher of Christian faith since the appearance of Gabriel Marcel." A practitioner of the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl mediated by a return to Immanuel Kant---in that things in themselves, though unknowable, are not excluded by bracketing existence but are acknowledged as the necessary conditions for the possibility of human experience---Ricoeur has examined those parts of experience---faulty, fallible, and susceptible to error and evil---that other phenomenologists, interested primarily in the cognitional, have neglected. In this respect he follows in the footsteps of Heidegger and Sartre, but he goes beyond them in his discovery of principles transcending human subjectivity that are amenable to spiritual interpretation. Here Ricoeur steps within the contemporary hermeneutic circle of Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer, on whom he has written. Ricoeur's hermeneutical method, however, has much in common with the methods of biblical exegesis, and in this respect his works should be especially appealing to seminarians and the clergy.

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