The Outline of History: Being a Plain History of Life and Mankind, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1920 - World history - 780 pages
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Review: The Outline of History, Vols. I and II

User Review  - Carlton R. - Goodreads

I read this book in my mid thirties as I recollect. It was on a discard pile in a second hand book store and I thought "what the hey it's in terrible shape but only a quarter." So I picked it up and ... Read full review

Review: The Outline of History, Vols. I and II

User Review  - Kevin Winder - Goodreads

Incredible book, a timeline of human existence. Incredible detail, especially enjoyed the chapters on the Roman Empire. It's a huge read but the wealth of information you can pick up makes it worth it. Highly recommended. Read full review

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Page 547 - Open covenants of peace, openly arrived at, after which there shall be no private international understandings of any kind, but diplomacy shall proceed always frankly and in the public view.
Page 296 - The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of individuals: it is a social compact, by which the whole people covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with the whole people, that all shall be governed by certain laws for the common good.
Page 594 - Human history becomes more and more a race between Education and Catastrophe' (HG Wells, The Outline of History (1920)).
Page 548 - A general association of nations must be formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political Independence and territorial integrity to great and small states alike.
Page 505 - To-day the United States is practically sovereign on this continent, and its fiat is law upon the subjects to which it confines its interposition.
Page 547 - Absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in peace and in war, except as the seas may be closed in whole or in part by international action for the enforcement of international covenants. III. The removal, so far as possible, of all economic barriers and the establishment of an equality of trade conditions among all the nations consenting to the peace and associating themselves for its maintenance.
Page 547 - A free, open-minded, and absolutely impartial adjustment of all colonial claims, based upon a strict observance of the principle that in determining all such questions of sovereignty the interests of the populations concerned must have equal weight with the equitable claims of the Government whose title is to be determined.
Page 548 - These, then, are some of the particulars, and I state them with the greater confidence because I can state them authoritatively as representing this Government's interpretation of its own duty with regard to peace : First.
Page 548 - First, the impartial justice meted out must involve no discrimination between those to whom we wish to be just and those to whom we do not wish to be just.
Page 15 - And your slaves ! See that ye feed them with such food as ye eat yourselves ; and clothe them with the stuff ye wear. And if they commit a fault which ye are not inclined to forgive, then sell them, for they are the servants of the Lord, and are not to be tormented.

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