Pride and Prejudice

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Plain Label Books, 2008 - Fiction - 312 pages
70 Reviews
When Elizabeth Bennet meets handsome bachelor Fitzwilliam Darcy, she immediately deems him proud--arrogant, conceited, and utterly obnoxious. When she later discovers that Darcy has deliberately turned another man against her beloved sister Jane, she resolves to have nothing more to do with him. In the comedy of manners that follows, Jane Austen portrays Elizabeth's prejudice toward a man who has resolved to be particularly careful to hide any sign of his admiration for her--with all of the consequent misunderstandings and entertaining reconciliations readers have come to expect from one of the finest British novelists. Newly designed and typeset in a modern 6-by-9-inch format by Waking Lion Press.
  

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Review: Pride and Prejudice

User Review  - Katrina Passick Lumsden - Goodreads

I heartily enjoy period romance. Jane Austen's particular style of writing, however, leaves me a bit cold. It's a rule that writers are supposed to write what they know. If Austen stayed true to that ... Read full review

Awesome read

User Review  - Anuja Menon - Flipkart

An amazing classic.. a must read book. loved how the writer takes us through that era.. I enjoyed every page and have added this book to my must read 100 books before you die list. Read full review

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Page 2 - IT is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
Page 4 - My dear Mr. Bennet." replied his wife, "how can you be so tiresome! You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them " "Is that his design in settling here?" "Design! Nonsense, how can you talk so! But it is very likely that he may fall in love with one of them, and therefore you must visit him as soon as he comes.
Page 3 - Do not you want to know who has taken it?' cried his wife, impatiently. 'You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.' This was invitation enough, 'Why, my dear, you must know, Mrs Long says that Netherfield is taken by a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he came down on Monday in a chaise and...
Page 148 - But the fact is, that being, as I am, to inherit this estate after the death of your honoured father (who, however, may live many years longer), I could not satisfy myself without resolving to choose a wife from among his daughters, that the loss to them might be as little as possible, when the melancholy event takes place which, however, as I have already said, may not be for several years. This has been my motive, my fair cousin, and I flatter myself it will not sink me in your esteem. And...
Page 147 - ... dissemble; my attentions have been too marked to be mistaken. Almost as soon as I entered the house I singled you out as the companion of my future life. But before I am run away with by my feelings on this subject, perhaps it will be advisable for me to state my reasons for marrying and moreover for coming into Hertfordshire with the design of selecting a wife, as I certainly did.
Page 6 - She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.
Page 48 - She did, indeed, Louisa. I could hardly keep my countenance. Very nonsensical to come at all ! Why must she be scampering about the country, because her sister had a cold? Her hair, so untidy, so blowsy!
Page 257 - In vain have I struggled. It will not do. .My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.
Page 15 - Which do you mean?" and turning round he looked for a moment at Elizabeth, till catching her eye, he withdrew his own and coldly said, " She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.
Page 147 - My reasons for marrying are, first, that I think it a right thing for every clergyman in easy circumstances (like myself) to set the example of matrimony in his parish. Secondly, that I am convinced it will add very greatly to my happiness; and thirdly, which perhaps I ought to have mentioned earlier, that it is the particular advice and recommendation of the very noble lady whom I have the honour of calling patroness.

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About the author (2008)

Jane Austena (TM)s (1775-1817) works have enjoyed a renewed popularity in the last year with the film release of Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility - both critically acclaimed. Sir Walter Scott said, Jane Austen had a oethat exquisite touch which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting.a

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