Memoirs of the Reign of George III to the Session of Parliament Ending A.D. 1793, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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G.G. and J. Robinson, 1795 - Great Britain
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Page 232 - I have no doubt, but, that by the concurrence and support of my parliament, by the valour of my fleets and armies, and by a vigorous, animated, and united exertion of the faculties and resources of my people, I shall be enabled to restore the blessings of a safe and honorable peace to all my dominions.
Page 297 - The United States, in Congress assembled, receive with emotions too affecting for utterance, the solemn resignation of the authorities under which you have led their troops with success through a perilous and a doubtful war. Called upon by your country to defend its invaded rights, you accepted the sacred charge, before it had formed alliances, and whilst it was without funds or a government to support you.
Page 180 - because they had acted in a manner repugnant to the honour and policy of this nation, and thereby brought great calamities on India, and enormous expenses on the East India company*" Here was no attempt on the charter.
Page 260 - That a claim of any body of men, other than the king, lords, and commons of Ireland to make laws to bind this kingdom, is unconstitutional, illegal, and a grievance.
Page 32 - Impressed with these ideas, we conceive that it is our duty, and we rejoice that it is in our power, to extend a portion of that freedom to others, which hath been extended to us...
Page 178 - Qu'ils apprennent donc que leurs faux principes sont la source la plus empoisonnée des malheurs de l'Europe. Voici l'erreur de la plupart des princes. Ils croient que Dieu a créé exprès, et par une attention toute particulière pour leur grandeur, leur félicité et leur orgueil, ; cette multitude d'hommes dont le salut leur est commis, et que leurs sujets ne sont destinés qu'à être les instruments et les ministres de leurs passions déréglées.
Page 270 - Commons full of confidence, when the nation is plunged in despair; in the utmost harmony with ministers, whom the people regard with the utmost abhorrence; who vote thanks, when the public opinion calls upon them for impeachments; who are eager to grant, when the general voice demands account; who, in all disputes between the people and...
Page 231 - that the war was liill unhappily prolonged, and that, to his great concern, the events of it had been very unfortunate to his army in Virginia, having ended in the total lofs of his forces in that province. But he could not...
Page 345 - That it is now necessary to declare, that, to report any opinion, or pretended opinion, of his Majesty upon any bill, or other proceeding, depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanor, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the constitution of this country...
Page 298 - Having defended the standard of liberty in this new world, having taught a lesson useful to those who inflict and to those who feel oppression, you retire from the great theatre of action with the blessings of your fellow-citizens.

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