The Celts: A History

Front Cover
Carroll & Graf, 2004 - History - 235 pages
11 Reviews
By the third century B.C., at the height of their greatest expansion, the Celts had spread from their Rhineland home as far west as Ireland and east to Turkey’s central plain, as far north as Belgium and south to Cadiz in Spain. They had crossed the Alps and defeated the armies of the Etruscan empire and had occupied Rome and invaded the Greek peninsula. Formidable warriors armed with iron weapons, they would find their way to Egypt and into Queen Cleopatra’s elite bodyguard. Tracking the progress of the Celts through the ancient world, this compelling history celebrates more than their warfare, for the Celts also developed agricultural techniques that even the Romans adopted. They cut the first roads through impenetrable European forests, displayed exuberant genius in their metalwork, monumental stone carvings, glassware, and jewelry, exerted influence on Greek philosophers and Roman surgeons, and made Irish the third literary language of Europe, after Latin and Greek. Bringing new material from anthropology and archaeology to this engaging illustrated survey, Ellis explores the remarkable achievements of a people who have survived three millennia, their heritors the Irish, Manx, Scots, Welsh, Cornish, and Bretons who speak a Celtic tongue to this day.

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Review: The Celts: A History (Brief History)

User Review  - Rick - Goodreads

I listened to this book. It was very interesting. I always thought of the Celts as a subset of Irish culture but a lot of the Celt history included Galatia (current Belgium, Netherlands, Germany) and ... Read full review

Review: The Celts: A History (Brief History)

User Review  - Jenny - Goodreads

Interesting but too dry. Good starter point on what to google next though. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Author and Celtic scholar Peter Berresford Ellis was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, England on March 10, 1943. Even though he received a BA and an MA in Celtic Studies, he decided to become a journalist and worked at numerous weekly newspapers throughout England and Ireland. In 1968, he published is first book Wales - A Nation Again about the Welsh struggle for political independence. One of his best known works is The Cornish Language and its Literature, which is considered the definitive history of the language. He became a full-time writer in 1975 and writes fiction under the pseudonyms Peter Tremayne and Peter MacAlan. He is the author of the Sister Fidelma Mystery series. In 1988, he received an Irish Post Award in recognition of his services to Irish historical studies.

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