A history of the struggle for slavery extension or restriction in the United States: from the Declaration of Independence to the present day. Mainly compiled and condensed from the journals of Congress and other official records, and showing the vote by yeas and nays on the most important divisions in either house (Google eBook)

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Dix, Edwards & Co., 1856 - Slavery - 164 pages
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Page 8 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States and admitted as soon as possible according to the principles of the federal Constitution to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of citizens of the United States, and in the mean time they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property and the Religion which they profess.
Page 28 - That in all that territory ceded by France to the United States, under the name of Louisiana, which lies north of thirtysix degrees and thirty minutes north latitude, not included within the limits of the State contemplated by this act, slavery and involuntary servitude, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes whereof the parties shall have been duly convicted, shall be and is hereby forever prohibited.
Page 88 - Territories, as recognized by the legislation of 1850, commonly called the compromise measures, is hereby declared inoperative and voidó it being the true Intent and meaning of this act, not to legislate slavery into any Territory or State, nor to exclude It therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic Institutions in their own way, subject only to the Constitution of the United States...
Page 71 - That the legislative power of the Territory shall extend to all rightful subjects of legislation, consistent with the Constitution of the United States and the provisions of this act ; but no law shall be passed interfering with the primary disposal of the soil; no tax shall be imposed upon the property of the United States ; nor shall the lands or other property of non-residents be taxed higher than the lands or other property of residents.
Page 17 - The powers delegated by the proposed constitution to the federal government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the state governments, are numerous and indefinite.
Page 87 - ... and each of the said district courts shall have and exercise the same jurisdiction in all cases arising under the constitution and laws of the United States...
Page 149 - Legislature), unless on presentment or indictment of a grand jury, and in any trial in any court whatever the party accused shall be allowed to appear and defend in person and with counsel as in civil actions.
Page 85 - That nothing in this act contained shall be construed to impair the rights of person or property now pertaining to the Indians m said Territory, so long as such rights shall remain unextinguished by treaty between the United States and such Indians...
Page 149 - That all courts shall be open, and every person, for an injury done him in his lands, goods, person, or reputation, shall have remedy by due course of law, and right and justice administered without sale, denial, or delay.
Page 42 - Texas, and having sufficient population, may hereafter, by the consent of said State, be formed out of the territory thereof, which shall be entitled to admission, under the provisions of the Federal Constitution. And such States as may be formed out of that portion of said territory lying south of...

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