A History of Medieval Europe

Front Cover
Pearson Longman, 2006 - History - 476 pages
5 Reviews

'Probably the best "buy" among recent works for one who comes to medieval history for the first time.'

History (about the second edition)

Consisting of two parts, this book successfully conveys the importance of the distant past in understanding our modern world. The first part; The Dark Ages, examines the impact of the Barbarian invasions on Constantine's Christianized empire, and the gradual emergence, by the end of the ninth century, of a new social, economic and political order. There are important chapters on the on the Church and the Papacy, the coming of Islam, and the rise and fall of the Frankish Empire.

The second part; The High Middle Ages, takes the reader from the Saxon Empire through to an examination of the European economy in the mid-thirteenth century. Important topics covered in this period include the spread of monasticism, the reform of the Papacy, the crusades, and feudal monarchy.

This has been the best introductory book in medieval history for fifty years, and still is.

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Review: A History of Medieval Europe: From Constantine to Saint Louis

User Review  - Steve Cooper - Goodreads

As an introduction to the period, this book cannot be beaten - even now so many years since it was written. New findings and ideas bookend the chapters. They bring you up to date, provide fascinating ... Read full review

Review: A History of Medieval Europe: From Constantine to Saint Louis

User Review  - Gayle Noble - Goodreads

I found this a book of two parts; I really enjoyed the sections on the papacy but found the sections on economic matters and descriptions of the differing ways on dividing feudal property a little dry ... Read full review

References to this book

Inventing Europe
Gerard Delanty
No preview available - 1995
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About the author (2006)

The late R H C Davis was Professor of Medieval History at the Universityof Birmingham, from 1970 to 1984, and Emeritus Professor until his death in 1991. He was also Emeritus Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a Fellow of the BritishAcademy. He wrote many successful and scholarly works, and in 1985 was honoured by the publication, ?Studies in Medieval History presented to R H C Davis?, edited by Henry Mayr-Harting and R I Moore, and published by Hambledon Press.

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