Scarlett Doesn't Live Here Anymore: Southern Women in the Civil War Era

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University of Illinois Press, Jul 1, 2004 - History - 271 pages
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Focusing on women - white and black, rich and poor - in the nineteenth century South, Laura Edwards reveals a full portrait of women and their political and social roles that reaches far beyond the passive stereotypes of the slave and southern belle.
Scarlett Doesn't Live Here Anymore demonstrates how women on every step of the social ladder worked actively throughout the period to shape southern society in ways that fulfilled their hopes for the future. They used the resources at their disposal to fashion their own positive identities, to create the social bonds that sustained them in difficult times, and to express powerful social critiques that helped them make sense of their lives.
  

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Review: Scarlett Doesn't Live Here Anymore: Southern Women in the Civil War Era

User Review  - Joanne - Goodreads

Edwards' book is not new, but remains a very good introduction to the subject of all classes of Southern women before, during, and after the Civil War. Read full review

Contents

Privilege and Its Price
15
The Myth of Male Independence
32
The Dilemmas of Womanhood in Slavery
48
DURING
65
Embracing That Which Would Destroy ThemE
71
Fighting Any Longer Is Fighting against God
85
For the Freedom of the Colored People
100
AFTER
117
Talking for Her Rights
125
We Is Poor but Wes Proud
149
This Is New and Disagreeable Work to Us All
171
Epilogue
187
Notes
191
Bibliography
233
Index
265
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About the author (2004)

Laura F. Edwards, an associate professor of history at the University of California at Los Angeles, is an associate editor of the Law and History Review journal.

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